Press freedom admits no exceptions, RSF tells South Korea

first_img South KoreaNorth KoreaAsia – Pacific Media independence News June 7, 2021 Find out more News Help by sharing this information RSF_en to go further Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists October 18, 2018 Press freedom admits no exceptions, RSF tells South Korea Organisation Receive email alerts In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survivalcenter_img Reporters Without Borders (RSF) regrets the South Korean government’s decision to ban a journalist who is a former North Korean defector from covering the talks with North Korean officials that took place in the demilitarized zone between the two countries on 15 October. A democracy cannot compromise on press freedom, RSF said. News Mongolia : RSF urges presidential candidates to voice support for press freedom June 10, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Asia – Pacific The victim was Kim Myong-song, who defected from North Korea in 2002 and has worked as a journalist for the South Korean conservative daily Chosun Ilbo since 2013.In apparent allusion to the sensitive nature of the talks, a spokesman for South Korea’s unification ministry said the ban, which was not requested by North Korea, was due to the “special circumstances.” He suggested that the presence of a reporter who is a former defector known for his hard-hitting articles might have upset the North Koreans and derailed the talks.“Press freedom cannot admit any exceptions, and excluding a South Korean journalist because of their North Korean origin or trenchant reporting style is unworthy of the great democracy that is South Korea,” said Cédric Alviani, the head of RSF’s East Asia desk. “The South Korea authorities must take care not to repeat this dangerous precedent.”After a dark decade for press freedom, South Korea saw a significant improvement last year and went from 63rd to 43rd in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. Moon Jae-in, a former human rights lawyer elected president in May 2017, has pledged to ensure that South Korea will be ranked 30th by the end of his term of office. South KoreaNorth KoreaAsia – Pacific Media independence News PHOTO: MINISTRY OF UNIFICATION AND JOINT COVERAGE POOL, SOUTH KOREA June 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Journalist imprisoned for expressing opinion

first_img BrazilAmericas RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America Follow the news on Brazil Alvanir Ferreira Avelino was freed on 10 September by a Rio de Janeirocourt until it could rule on his appeal against imprisonment.————————————-4.09.2003Reporters Without Borders said today it was outraged at the arrest and imprisonment of Alvanir Ferreira Avelino, of the daily Dois Estados, in Miracema (north of Rio de Janeiro), to serve a 10-and-a-half month “part-time” jail sentence under a law passed by the former military dictatorship restricting expression of opinion.”It is appalling that a press law from the army regime is still in effect,” said the organisation’s secretary-general, Robert Ménard, in a letter to Miguel Pachá, head of the Rio de Janeiro court. “Prison terms for voicing opinions must be removed from the statute book because they are excessive punishment.”He noted that the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression and Opinion had declared in January 2000 that imprisonment for peacefully voicing opinions was a serious violation of human rights.Ferreira Avelino was arrested on 29 August at his home in Campos (Rio de Janeiro state) and taken to Carlos Tinoco da Fonseca prison. He had been sentenced in 2001 to 10 months and 15 days in jail for “expressing an opinion” under the military regime’s 1967 press law. His lawyer, Paulo Rangel de Carvalho, said he was the only journalist convicted under the law.His wife, Viviane Terra de Avelino, said he was spending a day in prison each week of his sentence and was in a cell with a dozen other prisoners.Ferreira Avelino was sentenced in response to several libel suits against him in 1999 by Alexandre Mesquita, the Miracema town judge, who he accused in Dois Estados of abusing his authority.In May this year, lawyer Maurício Monteiro called for the sentence to be struck down because of a two-limit limit on press offences. He said the journalist “owed nothing more to the state.” April 27, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Organisation May 13, 2021 Find out more Alarm after two journalists murdered in Brazil Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information center_img April 15, 2021 Find out more BrazilAmericas News News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reports News September 15, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist imprisoned for expressing opinion to go furtherlast_img read more

Two journalists and a blogger arrested as police violently break up rally

first_img Help by sharing this information News Malaysian cartoonist Zunar facing possible sedition charge again March 17, 2021 Find out more November 10, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists and a blogger arrested as police violently break up rally February 22, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Malaysia to go further Reporters Without Borders today condemned brutality by riot police who broke up a peaceful demonstration in Kuala Lumpur on 8 November. Some 22 people were arrested during the day, including two journalists and a blogger. New Malaysian ordinance threatens very concept of truth Receive email alerts MalaysiaAsia – Pacific RSF_en News MalaysiaAsia – Pacific News Reporters Without Borders today condemned brutality by riot police who broke up a peaceful demonstration in Kuala Lumpur on 8 November. Some 22 people were arrested during the day, including two journalists and a blogger.Demonstrators were singing the national anthem at the rally, held by the Coalition for Clean and Fair Elections (Bersih) and supporters of famed blogger Raja Petra Kamarudin (RKP), when anti-riot police charged the crowd without warning.They arrested around 20 people and took them to a police station in Petaling Jaya, in the suburbs of the capital. Among those arrested were opposition Members of Parliament and one of the lawyers for the blogger RKP, who was released on 6 November after 54 days in custody without trial.Syukri Mahamad, a cameraman for news website Malaysiakini, and a blogger known under his pseudonym “Fisherman’s wharf”, were also arrested. Those arrested were well treated and released without charge early the next morning. The police confiscated Syukri Mahamad’s camera and refused to return it on the grounds that it was needed for their investigation into the “illegal demonstrations.” “We call on the government to open an investigation into the arbitrary and violent arrests of peaceful demonstrators, aggravated by the fact that the police chief gave the media a false version of the events,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said. “Journalists and bloggers should be able to cover demonstrations without suffering police threats and violence”, it added.On the same day, Rusnizam Mahat, journalist on the weekly Suara Keadilan, was arrested after a press conference held by the Selangor police chief, Khalid Abu Bakar, within the Petaling Jaya station at which he asked why arrests were made during peaceful demonstrations and the singing of the national anthem.Even though videos show the opposite (video showing that police charged during the singing of the Malaysian anthem “Negaraku”), Khalid Abu Bakar denied that he had failed to warn demonstrators before giving the order for them to be violently dispersed.At the end of the press conference, an officer and the police chief told Rusnizam Mahat to go to the interview room and asked him to make a statement. “Another officer asked me why I had gone to the demonstration and to the police station. After half an hour, I had to sign a statement and they released me”, he told Reporters Without Borders.Rusnizam Mahat said he had personally witnessed police brutality. “I saw a police officer harassing one of my journalist colleagues while he was taking embarrassing photos exposing police violence,” he said. Record fine for Malaysian news site over readers’ comments News Organisation January 29, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Eritrea

first_img Help by sharing this information At a time when many Arab-world dictators are losing their power, Asmara’s brutal and repressive regime is eager to prevent any attempt to destabilise the government. It continues to use a variety of tactics – including technical barriers and netizen intimidation – to keep the population from gaining access to the Web and its potential as a protest vehicle. EritreaAfrica Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? January 13, 2021 Find out more EritreaAfrica to go further Technical barriers To date, the Internet is the only space in which Eritreans are free to voice their opinions in a country which President Issaias Afeworki rules with an iron hand. The independent press was wiped off the map in 2001. The state-controlled media merely relay the regime’s ultra-nationalist ideology. The government has proven reluctant to accept Internet growth, fearing the Web’s potential for disseminating independent information. In this last African country to connect to the Net, in 2000, the penetration rate now hovers around 3.5%, which means that virtually all of the population has been excluded from the digital era. Telecom operator EriTel, which owns the network’s infrastructure, is directly controlled by the government. The Eritrean Ministry of Information granted a licence to the country’s four Internet service providers from whom EriTel rents its bandwidth. Since EriTel is under the authorities’ orders, network surveillance and slowing down bandwidth speed are easy tasks.The government has chosen not to increase bandwidth speed – a major technical barrier to connection – which explains why, more than sending e-mails (which can take a very long time) – chat has become the most popular way to communicate. Yahoo Messenger and Facebook’s “chat” function are constantly being used in cybercafés, where connection speeds are particularly slow.In fact, most of the Eritreans who connect to the Web do so from cybercafés, since they cannot access the Internet from their cell phones. To enjoy private access, netizens need to obtain a high-cost special authorisation from the regime.Intimidation of netizens: Arrests, blocking tactics, and surveillanceAlthough the government has not set up any widespread automatic Internet filtering system, it has not hesitated to order the blocking of several diaspora websites critical of the regime. Access to these sites is blocked by two of the Internet service providers, Erson and Ewan, as are pornographic websites and even YouTube. The latter would require too much bandwidth. Sometimes surveillance and self-censorship are enough. The two other Internet access providers, Eritel and Tifanus, do not block opposition websites, since they know that the great majority of Eritrean surfers would never dare to openly consult them for fear of being arrested and imprisoned.The few netizens and webmasters courageous enough to create an independent website, or collaborate in its development, are being threatened and closely monitored. It is commonplace for the authorities to intercept e-mails from individuals whom they consider “suspect.” The forty-odd Internet cafés, most of which mainly operate in Asmara, the capital, and in two or three other Eritrean cities, are constantly closely watched, particularly during periods of social unrest, or when compromising news about the regime is circulating abroad. At least two cybercafés are said to have been closed in 2010 and their owners arrested. The official excuse was that they were used for showing pornography to young netizens.In January 2011, several Internet users and bloggers were allegedly arrested in cybercafés, most of them in Asmara. Questioning such people has had a dissuasive effect on other Internet users.Propaganda and cyberattacksIn the last few years, the government has been waging an anti-Internet smear campaign in the traditional media – over which it has total control – accusing it of being devoted to pornography and media wars and of challenging the country’s cultural values and creating security problems.However, the regime also uses the Internet as a tool to disseminate its propaganda. The two official websites, Shabait.com and Shaebia.com, respectively owned by the Ministry of Information and the country’s sole party, the People’s Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ), disseminate only government propaganda. Online chat sessions are held to defend the authorities’ views. Some sites hosted in Europe or the United States relay the same positions, including meadna.com, eastafro.com, ertra.com, alenalki.com, and biddho.com. The topics are often belligerent, nationalist, anti-West and extremely aggressive towards the regime’s critics. Cyberattacks are regularly launched on sites based abroad and managed by dissidents, such as asmarino.com, assenna.com and awate.com. It is thought that the government and its supporters are behind these attacks.Response to uprisings in the Arab regionThe regime is wary of the popular uprisings which have recently shaken the Arab region, particularly in Tunisia and Egypt in late 2010 and in 2011. News about these events has been muzzled by the state-controlled media – the only legal means to circulate updates, while Eritreans have turned to satellite television and international radio broadcasts to keep informed.The Eritrean National Security Office (NSO) is allegedly examining the option of restricting the population’s access to satellite TV channels, which are very popular in the country. In this context, the launching of the terrestrial Channel 2 TV sports and entertainment network, could be seen as a first step towards a gradual ban on satellite dishes, on the pretext that sports and entertainment coverage no longer requires satellite access. At the first sign of unrests, the regime is prepared to cut off the country from the Internet, as was done in Egypt. In a country as repressive and sealed off from the world as Eritrea, Internet users are not as organised as in Egypt or Tunisia, where netizens are the civil society’s vital force. Meanwhile, most online mobilisation efforts are being launched from abroad. Follow the news on Eritrea March 11, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Eritrea News News Receive email alerts April 14, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak case News Organisation RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision Reports October 27, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Appeal court says reporter has to serve time in jail

first_img Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists News September 18, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Appeal court says reporter has to serve time in jail News Organisation NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say June 8, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information News Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts RSF_en Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa A Casablanca appeal court upheld a prison sentence for newspaper reporter Mostapha Hurmatallah today, just a week after he was freed pending the outcome of his appeal. “This ruling marks the end of the relative respite the Moroccan press has been enjoying of late,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Whatever the result of the petition that will be made to the court of final appeal, Morocco is now clearly on a dangerous slope.” Reporters Without Borders is dismayed by the Casablanca appeal court’s decision today to uphold a prison sentence for reporter Mostapha Hurmatallah of the Arabic-language weekly Al Watan Al An, one week after he was freed pending the outcome of his appeal. “This ruling marks the end of the relative respite the Moroccan press has been enjoying of late,” the press freedom organisation said. “Whatever the result of the petition that will now be made to the court of final appeal, Morocco is now clearly on a dangerous slope.”Reporters Without Borders added: “Hurmatallah’s release a week ago was seen as a sign of government good faith by the many foreign journalists who came to cover the second elections held under King Mohammed. But the judicial authorities returned to their bad old ways as soon as the spotlights were turned off.”In its decision today, the Casablanca appeal court upheld Hurmatallah’s prison sentence but reduced it by a month, from eights months to seven, and reduced Al Watan Al An editor Abderrahim Ariri’s suspended prison sentence from six months to five. It also reduced their fines to 1,000 dirhams (89 euros). The original sentences were passed by a Casablanca criminal court on 15 August.Their lawyers said they expected that Hurmatallah would remain free pending the outcome of their petition to the court of final appeal. Arrested on 17 July, Hurmatallah spent a total of 56 days in detention, most of it in Oukacha prison.__________________________11.09 – Journalist freed pending outcome of appeal against 8-month jail termReporters Without Borders hails today’s decision by the Casablanca appeal court to grant a request for the provisional release of Al Watan Al An reporter Mostapha Hurmatallah pending the outcome of his appeal against an eight-month prison sentence for publishing a leaked internal security memo.“We are pleased that a judge finally agreed to put an end to this journalist’s imprisonment, which was unacceptable,” the organisation said. “We now hope that Hurmatallah will be acquitted on appeal. This would be the only honourable outcome to a case that has done great harm to press freedom in Morocco and has traumatised its journalists.”Four lawyers spoke in Hurmatallah’s defence during today’s first hearing in his appeal case. They said Hurmatallah and his editor, Abderrahim Ariri, could not be accused of “receiving and concealing” state documents as they had already published them. They also disputed the charge of “violating state security”on the grounds that the two journalists had only wanted to inform the Moroccan public about issues involving its security. “The press hides nothing and reveals everything,” one of the lawyers told the court.The judge consented to their request for Hurmatallah’s provisional release after they argued that the journalist, who is married and has one child, needed to be with his family during “the sacred month of Ramadan.” Previous requests for his release had been turned down.Hurmatallah had been detained since 17 July, the date on which he and his editor were arrested over a series of stories in the 14 July issue headlined, “The secret reports behind Morocco’s state of alert.” A Casablanca court convicted them on 15 August of “receiving documents obtained by criminal means” under article 571 of the criminal code. Ariri, who had been released on 24 July, received a six-month suspended sentence but Hurmatallah was ordered to serve a sentence of eight months in prison.The appeal court is expected to issue its decision on 18 September.For more information:15.08.2007: Journalist gets eight months in prison for story based on leaked security memo April 28, 2021 Find out more to go further Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance News April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Ministers urged not to follow Chinese model of online censorship

first_img “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says to go further News June 11, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Ministers urged not to follow Chinese model of online censorship Follow the news on Belarus Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Read the letter to communications and informatisation minister Nikolai Pantelei RSF_en BelarusEurope – Central Asia News News Reporters Without Borders has written to the Belarusian ministers of information and communication condemning the comments about online regulation that deputy information minister Liliya Ananich made during a round table organised by the magazine Belaruskaya Dumka on 2 June.Ananich said the information ministry was “unambiguously committed to the legislative regulation of the operation of Internet mass media” and that websites that wanted to “act as mass media” should be registered in accordance with a established procedure “defined either by the Mass Media Law or a regulatory act of the government.” She also referred to the use of Chinese expertise to block access to foreign websites that could have a “bad influence” on the Belarusian Internet.Addressing information minister Uladzimir Rusakevich, Reporters Without Borders wrote: “Most Belarusian citizens are regular Internet users. We are aware that it is important to regulate website content but we are also convinced that freedom of expression should not suffer as a result. We would therefore be grateful if you would send us the provisional findings of the working group you set up last year to study Internet legislation in various countries in order to identify regulations that could be applied in Belarus.”Another participant in the 2 June round table, Oleg Proleskovsky, who heads the informational analysis centre at the office of the president, said: “In organisational terms, it is necessary to use so-called content-filtering software. This is software that helps users or local network administrators block access from computers, for which they are responsible, to sites containing information that conflicts with current legislation or public moral standards.”In its letter to communications and informatisation minister Nikolai Pantelei, Reporters Without Borders asked what software the government planned to use to regulate the Internet in Belarus.“We would like to know what kinds of websites are targeted by these filtering methods and the precise reasons for using such filtering,” the letter said. “We regard this manifest desire to control content as a threat to online freedom of expression. It is all the more reprehensible that you envisage a partnership with China, the world’s leading online censor.”Read the letter to information minister Uladzimir Rusakevichcenter_img May 28, 2021 Find out more Related documents Letter to Uladzimir RusakevichPDF – 77.76 KBLetter to Nikolai PanteleiPDF – 71.5 KB Receive email alerts Organisation June 2, 2021 Find out more RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” News Help by sharing this information BelarusEurope – Central Asia May 27, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

RSF calls for probe into Saudi journalist’s death after release from prison

first_img RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance A few months before being murdered, Khashoggi had defended him in various media outlets. “Saleh Al-Shehi is courageous,” he said. “Those who want to be independent and raise awareness go abroad where they can speak freely, but Saleh Al-Shehi committed a suicide by staying and writing articles [in Saudi Arabia].” Organisation Saudi media silent on RSF complaint against MBS Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists RSF_en The news that Al-Shehi died on 19 July has shocked Saudis. The illness has not been formally named but some media outlets such as the Saudi daily Al-Riyadh spoke of three weeks of complications resulting from a Covid-19 infection. His family has not provided any details. Follow the news on Saudi Arabia to go further News Al-Shehi often wrote about poverty and nepotism within the elite, and called for a debate about the major reforms under way in in Saudi Arabia. He was arrested in December 2017 after talking about corruption within the royal court on the Saudi TV channel Rotana’s programme “Ya Hala,” and was sentenced in February 2018 to five years in prison followed by a five-year ban on leaving the country for “insulting the royal court.” A well-known columnist for the reformist daily Al-Watan, Al-Shehi was dubbed “the proletariat’s writer” by his friend Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist living in self-imposed exile who was murdered in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October 2018. RSF has meanwhile just learned that the political commentator Akl Al-Bahli has been arrested. The arrest occured on 29 April after he offered his condolences when human rights defender Abdullah Al-Hamid died in prison as a result of medical negligence. June 8, 2021 Find out more July 24, 2020 RSF calls for probe into Saudi journalist’s death after release from prisoncenter_img Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Al-Shehi was released on 19 May to general surprise. At the time, RSF was unable to establish the reasons for his release or whether it was conditional. His health deteriorated quickly thereafter. On 26 June, his son Watan published a prayer for recovery while, in a post the same day, his nephew Mohamed reported that he had been in intensive care for more than ten days. News News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for an independent international inquiry under the UN’s aegis to determine the degree to which the Saudi authorities were responsible for journalist Saleh Al-Shehi’s death from an illness, probably Covid-19, two months after his release from prison. News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say “We demand an independent international inquiry under the UN’s aegis to shed all possible light on a possible link between Saleh Al-Shehi’s death and the conditions in which he was held,” said Sabrina Bennoui, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “His sudden release two months before he died raises doubts and requires explanations and transparency on the part of the Saudi authorities. If he fell ill in prison, they must assume full responsibility.” April 28, 2021 Find out more Saudi Arabia is ranked 170th out of 180 countries and territories in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists March 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Komsomolskaya Pravda abducted near Ajdabiya

first_img April 8, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Komsomolskaya Pravda abducted near Ajdabiya News Help by sharing this information The two Komsomolskaya Pravda reporters, Dmitry Steshin and Aleksandr Kots, were abducted near Ajdabiya. They managed to phone their newspaper at 11:10 a.m. (Paris time) to report that gunmen had intercepted their vehicle and were taking them in an unknown direction. The rebels released them that evening. Several cameramen working for the Russian television station NTV were kidnapped at the same time. An NTV representative said they were later released. center_img RSF_en Organisation last_img read more

The Kurdish blogger Kamal Hussein Sheikou arrested

first_img Organisation The Kurdish blogger Kamal Hussein Sheikou, the author of many articles on the All4syria website, was arrested during a demonstration outside the interior ministry in Damascus just two days after being freed on bail. He was held on the same charges as those on which he was arrested on 23 June 2010, trying to enter Lebanon using his brother’s passport (http://en.rsf.org/syrie-growing-crackdown-on-journalists-01-07-2010,3785…). He was released again on 10 May on 5,000 Syrian pounds (73 euros) in bail, only to be re-arrested during a demonstration on 20 May and held for two days. RSF_en March 15, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 The Kurdish blogger Kamal Hussein Sheikou arrestedcenter_img News Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

A third web dissident arrested

first_img Help by sharing this information News April 7, 2021 Find out more April 22, 2021 Find out more VietnamAsia – Pacific 29.04.2002On 29 April, we learned that Son Hong Pham is being detained at Prison B14, near Hanoi. His wife, Ha Thuy Vu, has not been allowed to visit him since his arrest on 27 March 2002. As a result of pressure and threats, she has been forced to leave their home, together with their two sons. According to The Democracy Club for Vietnam Club, the government has issued a statement in which the dissident is accused of “spying” and “dissemination of anti-state and anti-Vietnam Communist Party documents “. ______________________________________________________________17.04.2002In a letter addressed to the Vietnamese Minister for Public Security, Lieutenant General Le Minh Huong, Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières – RSF) calls for the release of Vietnamese dissident Son Hong Pham, arrested by police for having written, translated and published on the Internet texts promoting democracy. “This new arrest of a web dissident, the third in just over a month, is a callous confirmation of the Vietnamese authorities’ intention to censure freedom of expression on the Internet”, states Robert Ménard, General Secretary of the organisation. RSF renewed its call for the release of the dissident Le Chi Quang and the ending of the house arrest of the dissident Tran Khue.   According to information obtained by RSF, Son Hong Pham, a doctor and sales representative for a pharmaceutical company, was arrested in Hanoi on 29 March 2002. His arrest apparently followed the translation and publication on the Internet of an article entitled “What is democracy?”, which previously appeared on the web site of the United States embassy in Vietnam.On 25 March 2002, Colonel Le Van, a member of the special police unit P4-A25, called at Son Hong Pham’s house and ordered him to report to the special unit. There, the dissident was questioned about his translations of articles from the American embassy’s web site. Shortly afterwards, Son Hong Pham’s home in Hanoi was searched by eight members of the special unit, who confiscated computer equipment and personal papers. On 26 March, Son Hong Pham returned to the police station to claim his personal belongings, but without success. The following day, he published an open letter on the Internet protesting against the illegal search of his home and the confiscation of his personal belongings. Two days later, his family announced that he had “disappeared”. A member of the family confirmed by telephone on 15 April that Son Hong Pham was still being detained. His mother had been allowed to visit him in prison. Son Hong Pham is also the author of a number of articles, including “Democracy promotion: a key focus in a new world order” and “Sovereignty and human rights: the search for reconciliation”, published on the Internet forums Danchu.net and Ykien.net, both dedicated to promoting democracy. On 6 March 2002 he sent one of his articles, entitled “Promising signals for democracy in Vietnam”, to the Secretary-General of the Vietnamese Community Party, General Nong Duc Manh. RSF reminds readers that web dissidents Le Chi Quang and Tran Khue are still being detained after publishing articles criticising the Vietnamese authorities on the Internet. Le Chi Quang, a computer science lecturer who also holds a degree in law, was arrested at a Hanoi Internet café on 21 February 2002 and is being held in camp B14 in the Ha Dong province (in the north of the country). Tran Khue has been under house arrest since 10 March 2002 by virtue of the administrative directive 31/CP. This decision follows the publication on the Internet of a letter addressed to the Chinese leader Jiang Zemin, on the eve of an official visit to Vietnam. to go further News Follow the news on Vietnam Receive email alerts RSF_en center_img News News Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang April 27, 2021 Find out more VietnamAsia – Pacific Organisation Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison April 29, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 A third web dissident arrestedlast_img read more