TRAFFIC ADVISORY Wilmington DPW Announces Upcoming Paving Projects For 8 Streets

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is an announcement from the Wilmington Department of Public Works:Please be advised that the Wilmington Department of Public Works will be grinding and resurfacing the following roadways, tentatively starting for the end of July 2019:– Arlene Avenue (from Dorothy to Ella Avenue)– Franklin Avenue– Ella Avenue– Birch Road– Burt Road– Canal Street– Corey Avenue– Grand Street (from Birch Road to #9 Grand Street)More specific dates will be communicated as they become available.During operations, no street parking will be permitted.Partial lane closures and full road closures are anticipated. Local residents will have access to their properties, although there may be short delays.Please obey the directives of police details, detour signs, and warning signs during all construction operations, and again, please do not park on the street.If you have any questions, or require additional information, please contact the Department of Public Works at 978-658-4481.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedTRAFFIC ADVISORY: Wilmington DPW Announces Paving Projects In Arlene Ave. & Burt Rd. Neighborhoods On Aug. 12-13In “Government”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, August 13, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, August 12, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Galaxy Fold release delayed until June while Samsung investigates breaking screens

first_img 60 Photos AT&T Samsung 10:12 News of the phone’s delayed release was reported earlier Monday by The Wall Street Journal. That report follows a tweet from Engadget’s Richard Lai on Sunday about the postponement of launch-related events in Hong Kong and Shanghai that were originally scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively.  Samsung’s Galaxy Fold woes began last week, two days after it distributed a small number of review devices to reviewers, including CNET. Reviewers discovered that peeling the plastic film off the Galaxy Fold’s 7.3-inch interior screen, which is made of a thin sheet of bendable plastic rather than glass, instantly made the phone unusable.  Comments Now playing: Watch this: 5:50 Tags Share your voice Our Galaxy Fold didn’t break. Here’s what’s good and… Samsung Galaxy Fold problems explained Originally published April 21.Updates, April 22 at 7:52 a.m. PT: Adds the WSJ report about the launch delay; 10:22 a.m.: Adds confirmation from Samsung; 12:03 p.m. PT: Adds Samsung preorder email. Republished at 5:22 p.m. PT and April 24 at 10:41 a.m. PT.center_img “Samsung.com will have a dedicated Galaxy Fold FAQ for consumers to learn more about caring for the Galaxy Fold, including information about the protective layer. Retail representatives and customer care are trained with information about the top protective layer.”CNET is keeping an eye on developments with the Galaxy Fold. While we’re continuing to review the early production device, we will not assign a rating until after we test the final production phone we ordered. See how it’s going with our Galaxy Fold so far. Samsung hit the pause button on its beleaguered Galaxy Fold after several incidents with screens last week left early-production review units unusable. Although the phone-maker said that it will announce a new release date for its first foldable phone “in the coming weeks,” AT&T on Tuesday sent an email to preorder customers with a new shipping date: June 13.CNET has fully reviewed the Galaxy Fold and our review unit has remained intact. We’ve been in contact with Samsung about the reported screen issues. Samsung also emailed everyone who preordered the device — including CNET reviewers — saying that it will update them “with more specific shipping information in two weeks.” It’s possible that T-Mobile and Samsung will choose slightly different shipping dates, or that AT&T should shift its new timetable as a result of the Fold’s future fixes. Samsung isn’t charging credit cards for the Fold until it ships, and the brand is also giving preorder buyers and out if they change their mind and want to cancel the order before it ships.An email Samsung sent on Monday to people who preordered the Galaxy Fold. Screenshot by CNET Foldable phones are a brand-new concept rocking the phone world. The design is supposed to give people double the screen space on a device that’s small enough to carry around, unlike today’s pocket-busting devices. But the enormous expense — the Galaxy Fold starts at $1,980 — and concerns over the durability of a bendable screen and hinge could threaten the ability of foldable phones to get off the ground.The incidents with the Fold’s plastic screen — which include a screen bulge and flickering display — have caused a kerfuffle among onlookers, casting doubt on the durability of Samsung’s $2,000 foldable phone. While Samsung’s screen woes could have been much worse, rivals might also find a way to learn from Samsung’s mistakes. Huawei has also announced a foldable device, the Mate X, and Motorola is rumored to have a foldable Razr in the works.”Initial findings from the inspection of reported issues on the display showed that they could be associated with impact on the top and bottom exposed areas of the hinge. There was also an instance where substances found inside the device affected the display performance,” Samsung said in a statement. “To fully evaluate this feedback and run further internal tests, we have decided to delay the release of the Galaxy Fold.”Read: Galaxy Fold “loss” could help other foldable phones succeed Another discovered that the left half of the Galaxy Fold strongly flickered, and two more noticed a bulge under the screen that caused noticeable distortion in the screen’s image, possibly from debris that worked its way under the display. “While many reviewers shared with us the vast potential they see, some also showed us how the device needs further improvements that could ensure the best possible user experience,” Samsung said Monday. “We will take measures to strengthen the display protection. We will also enhance the guidance on care and use of the display including the protective layer so that our customers get the most out of their Galaxy Fold.” 201-galaxy-foldThe Fold is extremely pocketable when all closed up. Sarah Tew/CNET The incidents with the Galaxy Fold are also putting Samsung under intense scrutiny as consumers and industry pundits draw parallels with Samsung’s double recall of 2016’s Galaxy Note 7, after numerous reports that its battery overheated and sometimes caught fire. Screen issues tied to the Galaxy Fold have “broken” the phones, but have not been reported to cause a fire or any other damage to people and property. Samsung can address at least one recurring issue, where reviewers pulled off a sheet of plastic that wound up being an integral part of the screen. The company told CNET in a statement last week: “We are taking all necessary measures to ensure that information about protective layer is clearly delivered to our customers. Materials in the Galaxy Fold box, including the quick-start guide, will include information about the protective layer.”  19 Close up with the Galaxy Fold screen, notch and hinge People try the Galaxy Fold for the first time Now playing: Watch this: 3:56 Now playing: Watch this: Foldable Phones Tabletslast_img read more

33 killed in S Korea hospital fire

first_imgHeavy grey smoke rises into the air from a fire at a hospital building in Miryang on January 26, 2018. At least 31 people were killed in a blaze at a hospital in South Korea on January 26, Yonhap news agency said, with dozens more injured. AFPAt least 33 people were killed in a blaze at a hospital in South Korea on Friday, firefighters said, with more than 70 injured.It is the second devastating blaze in just a month in the advanced country, Asia’s fourth-largest economy.Videos posted on social media showed a patient hanging on to a rope dangling from a helicopter above the hospital in Miryang, and another crawling out of a window to climb down a ladder.The six-storey structure housed a nursing home as well as the hospital, and the National Fire Agency said 33 people had been killed, with 13 critically injured.Another 61 suffered light injuries, a spokesman said, adding the death toll could rise further.“Two nurses said they had seen fire suddenly erupting in the emergency room,” said fire chief Choi Man-Woo, but the cause of the blaze was not immediately known.All the patients had been brought out, he said, adding that evacuating 15 patients from the intensive care unit on the third floor took longer as firefighters had to wait for medical staff to supervise the process.“The victims came both from the hospital and the nursing home,” he said. “Some died on their way to another hospital.”Video footage and pictures showed the building engulfed by heavy dark smoke and surrounded by multiple fire trucks.Survivors were brought out wrapped in blankets, and firefighters picked their way through the blackened shell of the building after the blaze was extinguished.Around 200 people were in the Sejong Hospital building when the fire broke out, police said.South Korean President Moon Jae-In held an emergency meeting with advisers to discuss response measures, his office said.The fire came only a month after 29 people were killed in an inferno at a fitness club in the South Korean city of Jecheon—a disaster blamed on insufficient emergency exits, flammable finishing materials and illegally parked cars blocking access to emergency vehicles.Friday’s fire is South Korea’s worst since 2008 when a blaze at a warehouse in the city of Incheon killed 40 workers.The worst fire ever in modern South Korea was an arson attack on a subway station in the southeastern city of Daegu in 2003 that left 192 people dead and nearly 150 injured.last_img read more