MESSENGERS OF PEACE

first_imgThe Government of Liberia has reached an important milestone in the fight against Ebola with the opening of schools and putting in place protocols, amid a drastically reduced number of new cases  of Ebola Virus Disease in the country.Now that the worst is over, there is an urgent need to make up for a lost school year. The focus now in this post- Ebola recovery process is for schools to put in place conditions that are as safe as possible for children.School protocols should include safety measures, not only taking children’s temperatures when they arrive at their school campuses and making them wash their hands before entering classrooms.  They should, in addition, take into account children’s temperatures as they return to their respective communities, along with the distribution of Ebola preventive materials to use at home. The measures  should include classroom spacing, student-to-teacher  and health workers ratio.All schools should be equipped with adequate source of water supply and school children should have access to safe sanitary facilities, like urinals and toilets. In cases of detected elevated temperature among school children, schools should be mandated to provide temporary isolation space for suspected cases.Zoning of healthcare facilities by schools and health workers should be put into place to ensure adequate transportation of suspected cases to appropriate healthcare facilities. Contact tracing and follow-up visits to monitor children who may be absent from school for health reasons and medical clearance should be required from students who have been sick to return to school.Additional safety precautions at our schools would require psychosocial support as some children may not return to school and many who lost their parents and friends may find it difficult to cope with school work.Dealing with stigmatization of Ebola survivors and victims would be critical at this stage. The decision to expel students who deliberately flaunt protocols for safe school is harsh and should be amended (see page 8 of the protocols for details).In addressing the psychosocial needs of school children, Messengers of Peace (MOP)-Liberia, is committed, through its peace clubs and community education outreach campaigns/programmes, to work with the Liberian government, the private sector  and others. It is essential to educate our children about Ebola as a disease and it is equally important to educate them about its psychosocial impact to our stability as a nation. More than anything else in the school curriculum, our children must learn about the Ebola crisis and the period they had to stay away from learning.The private and not-for-profit  sections now have an important role to play in ensuring complete adherence to the protocols for safe school environment. Governments (local and national) should also focus more on providing essential services to poor community schools. The theme of the protocols for safe school environment in the Ebola outbreak in Liberia should be in the best interest of school children.We are only months away from when Liberia would be declared “Ebola-free.” Until then and with an end in sight, we need to redouble our collective efforts to stop and eradicate Ebola from our country. Support the “Ebola Educates” Campaign in kind through your stories or with your generous cash donation.Until next week when we come to you with another article on: “Ebola Educates-Community Protocols,” Peace First, Peace above all else, May Peace prevail on earth.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Nanny Goat in Custody

first_imgThe Buchanan City Court in Grand Bassa County is holding a nanny goat in custody while two men claim ownership of the animal.The plaintiff, identified as Amadu Jalloh, a resident of Kilby Street in Buchanan City, complained to the court that on December 29, 2014, one Harris Luke unlawfully stole his white-striped brown and black nanny goat.Jalloh told the court that the nanny goat cost him US$60. The case is being presided over by Associate Magistrate Vasco Brown. Defendant Harris Luke has formally been charged with theft of property, which is violation of section 15.51 of the New Penal Law of Liberia.At the hearing last week, the state was represented byAssistant City Solicitor Johnson Tukeh, while Grand Bassa County Public Defender, Cllr. Paul P. Jarvan represented the defendant.Cllr. Jarvan requested the court to dismiss the case on the grounds that since the defendant was taken to court, the private prosecutor had deliberately failed to appear to proceed with the case, which contravenes section 18.2 of the Criminal Procedure Law of Liberia.“The holding of the defendant’s property clearly indicates that the state does not have sufficient evidence to prosecute the case,” he argued.In response, the state said the defense must be in line with the law, and at that juncture, the prosecution interposed no objection.The court, having listened to the submissions of the two lawyers, ordered the return of the nanny goat to defendant Luke in keeping with the Law of Liberia.According to the Police Charge Sheet, Defendant Harris Luke, 26, a resident on New York Street in Buchanan, during investigations, reportedly said he bought the goat from one Francis Glaydor on December 28, 2014.According to him, the goat went missing from his residence on Kilby Street on December 29.Based on this circumstance, the police charged defendant Luke with “theft of property.”The Daily Observer gathered that an unidentified lady found the nanny goat in a sugar cane farm and called Radio Gbehzohn FM 106.3 requesting the owner to retrieve it. After the announcement, the two men came to claim ownership which eventually got to the police.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Nuefville Outlines Challenges

first_imgDeputy Internal Affairs Minister for Urban Activities, Stephen Nuefville, said despite successes made in waste management as a whole, there are enormous challenges and gaps in solid waste management (SWM) in the country.Some of the challenges, he said, include the need to formulate a National Solid Waste Management Policy (NSWMP) to provide the compass for the direction of how SWM should be effectively handled for efficiency and sustainability. Another is the inability of the system to achieve 100 percent coverage in central Monrovia.Nuefville named inadequate government contribution to SWM service delivery due to the effect of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) on the national economy; prolonged delays in land acquisition for a permanent landfill site for Monrovia City Corporation (MCC); lack of sanitary landfill sites in the pilot cities of Kakata, Margibi County, and Buchanan, Grand Bassa County, and the absence of organized SWM service delivery in other cities and urban centers as other challenges to adequate SWM in Liberia.He highlighted the challenges yesterday at the opening of a one-day National Solid Waste Management Policy Validation (NSWMP) held in Bentol City, Montserrado County.The NSWNP, he said, became necessary because the country is experiencing unprecedented demographic shifts and patterns in terms of migration; rapid urbanization and population growth; increased economic and commercial activities, among others. “(It is necessary) to put in place an organized and sustainable Solid Waste Management (SWM) services delivery system,” he added.Mr. Nuefville said Liberia has so far recorded remarkable achievements in the effective and organized SWM service delivery in central Monrovia, Kakata and Buchanan cities, supported by the World Bank and the Gates Foundation for more than 60 percent of the population.He noted that with the growing population of urban cities across the country, waste collection cannot be done as usual. “Instead, laws should be enacted to ensure the cooperation of the citizenry to get involved in the exercise,” he added.Meanwhile, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Country Representative to Liberia, Sheldon Yett, assured participants of the entity’s support to the SWM policy.Mr. Yett said UNICEF will provide the initial support to develop the policy document by organizing solid waste management systems in Liberia, adding that the support will depend on financial resources from the National Budget.Yett expressed the hope that the policy document will be used to address Liberia’s waste situation effectively, and not left on the shelf, adding that there can be experts from around the world to draft the policy, “but implementation matters the most.”In her welcome remark, Bentol City Mayor Christine Tolbert Norman expressed appreciation for the validation exercise and promised to abide by whatever policy was formulated at the end of the program. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

ERU Officer Assaults SWAL Boss, Others

first_imgThe president of the Sports Writers Association of Liberia, SWAL, Mr. Roland Mulbah and several other members were last Friday assaulted by an officer of the Emergency Response Unit (ERU) of the Liberia National Police, causing them serious injuries.The incident occurred before the Liberia versus La Cote d’Ivoire match when ERU officers refused to allow some members of the SWAL to enter the stadium.Mr. Mulbah, who participated in a joint meeting with the Liberia National Police to craft guidelines for the game, explained to the officers that the SWAL was assured by the LNP that its officers would be informed about the joint decision on sports writers covering the game, but the officers were adamant.“One of the officers threatened to beat us if we did not leave the area,” Mulbah told the Daily Observer afterwards. “When I told him that it was a joint decision with the LNP and pleaded with him to let our members enter the stadium, he began to whip us, pointing his gun on us.”The assault resulted into a cut on Mulbah’s right jaw, and as blood oozed out of his injury, the officer got more incensed and continued his assault, as bystanders looked in shock.As the ERU officer beat the president of SWAL and several others, Victor Bowier, in charge of security at the LFA, and also a police officer, was called in, whose interventions ended the torture that the SWAL president and his members were undergoing.Mulbah and his colleagues received treatment at a nearby clinic before returning to the game. Mulbah’s jaw was bandaged. He expressed regret of the ERU officer’s action and appealed to the LNP to ensure that when decisions are made, “every officer who will be involved is informed about it.”Before the match, LNP Deputy Director for Operations, Prince Mulbah and SWAL president, along with SWAL Secretary General Kolubah Zayzay participated in the joint conference that came out with guidelines to ensure the smooth management of the match against La Cote d’ivoire.SWAL president Mulbah at the time said the association was working closely with the LNP to provide better coverage for the game.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

The Other Side of It

first_imgMiatta has a story to tell, one that describes the loss of innocence.“Since I was a child, I’ve been living from home to home. I quite recently moved back in with my biological mother and understand why,” she says.Miatta composes herself just like any normal teenager would; she spends most of her time playing jumprope, kickball and hanging out with friends.But she hides a dark secret.According to Miatta, the hardest part of her life is having to answer the one question so many people ask her over and over again.“Where is your pa?,”Nine years ago, Fallah, Miatta’s father, was arrested and charged for the rape of a seven year old girl; Miatta’s friend.“Our mothers went out of town and left us at my aunty’s house for the weekend. My father lived in his own house back then and never had access to us throughout the weekend. I don’t know how she was raped by my father,” Miatta said.Miatta was five when officers knocked on her mothers door to tell her about her husband’s arrest.“They said my father raped my friend that weekend and he has been in jail since then,” she added.Ironically, the complainant never followed the case and, according to Miatta, her father has been in prison for the past nine years without trial.“I was 10 when my mother told me about my father. And she did so by taking me to the Monrovia Central Prison to see him,”she says. “It was scary, but after he told me his side, I decided not to judge him,” she added.Since then, Miatta has been visiting her father weekly, never once missing a week.“My concern is knowing the truth and that can only be done if my father is given a fair trail. Where are his accusers? Since they accused my father, they just left him in prison,” Miatta added.Meanwhile, Miatta says she wants justice to be served if her father is guilty and set free if he’s Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Bidding Farewell to All

first_imgAs my tenure as U.S. Ambassador to Liberia comes to a close, I first and foremost want to thank all Liberians for so warmly welcoming me to your beautiful country. You have all made me feel very much at home here during the past three years. I am sad to be leaving Liberia, but I can assure you that I will carry this country and its people in my heart. The bond I share with you is not only because of the friendship between our two countries or your warm hospitality; we are bound together because of our shared experience in facing the national nightmare of Ebola. When the disease struck Liberia in March 2014, Liberia was on the right trajectory in its recovery from conflict – moderate but steady economic growth resulting from thoughtful policies and the support of citizens, who keep the government accountable to the people.The Ebola epidemic was an unexpected and unprecedented emergency that hit a region with few resources to address the threat and winning that fight has proven to be a marathon task with many unexpected obstacles and difficulties along the way. Liberia, despite having the most Ebola-related deaths, was the first of the three highly impacted countries to reach zero. Led by President Sirleaf, the government of Liberia achieved this milestone by clearly communicating with its citizens at the local level and empowering them to take action – qualities which will serve Liberia well as you move toward the important goal of decentralization. Dealing with this extended emergency stalled the government of Liberia’s broader efforts to improve life for Liberians, but there have been notable successes over the past three years that may have been obscured by the Ebola response. To those who are impatient about the pace of change, I say that change is hard, but many hands make light work. What do I mean? Development, consolidation of democratic governance, and reconciliation are all processes that take time, but by working together, valuing differences and committing to the greater good, progress comes more quickly. More importantly, progress comes when Liberians put their country ahead of their own narrow interests and work together, as the united fight against Ebola so forcefully demonstrated. A notable success – Liberia has one of the liveliest and most open forums in Africa for the media to do their jobs. That is a direct result of changes your government instituted, including embracing the tenets of open government and granting ordinary citizens access to information. This is all the more significant as Liberia enters the 2017 election cycle. Another notable success – the National Elections Commission has organized multiple successful contests, including the December 2014 Senate elections. Although the elections were delayed by Ebola concerns and judicial challenges, the NEC and judiciary were able to resolve the situation and allow the elections to proceed. It was a very positive sign of the maturation of Liberia’s political and institutional development and the ability of Liberians to organize well-run elections that were judged by observers to be free and fair.And that’s not all. The Ministry of Health is rebuilding its capacity at the central, county, district and community levels with support from our extensive USAID programs that have helped put in place the underlying structures leading to better health sector governance, management, accountability, and effectiveness. Major accomplishments include improvements in the quality and availability of primary health care services for mothers and children in some of Liberia’s hardest to reach communities. Additionally, by mobilizing the leadership of rural communities, USAID has brought those communities improved sanitation facilities and greater access to clean drinking water. We also welcomed the establishment of a permanent Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) country office in Liberia, to assist with building capacity to prevent, detect and respond to infectious disease outbreaks. Since the Ebola outbreak, the CDC has worked with the Ministry of Health to strengthen data management and surveillance systems and strengthen laboratory capacity and testing for diseases of public health concern, establishing infection prevention and control standards at health facilities and building the public health workforce capacity in the country. With the strengthening of the health systems in Liberia, we are progressing towards a healthier and better prepared Liberia to respond to another disease outbreak.Of course, none of these accomplishments could happen in a security vacuum. Maintaining peace and social stability is a prerequisite for Liberia’s democratic and economic development. The United States has worked closely with the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) and with the Liberia National Police (LNP) to strengthen these institutions, and both are increasingly ready to assume full responsibility for Liberia’s security as the drawdown of UNMIL continues. The growing cooperation and joint exercises between AFL and LNP is of vital importance to improve the interoperability between the forces and reinforce the military’s role in support of the civilian security forces. The merit-based appointment of career law enforcement officers in the leadership positions of both the LNP and the Liberia Drug Enforcement Agency (LDEA) is a critical step towards fulfilling the government’s responsibility to protect its citizens through its civilian security forces. The LDEA has also made tremendous strides over the past two years in its operational capacity and professionalism, and the passage of the new LDEA Act and drug law in 2014 provides a strong foundation for even more effective law enforcement activities. LDEA’s deployment in 2014 to both Monrovia-based airports quickly resulted in several successful interdictions, and I am confident that its deployment to the Freeport of Monrovia will prove just as fruitful. These accomplishments provide the underpinnings on which future growth and investment will be made, but are intangible. Improved roads and a functioning electrical grid are the tangible items that Liberians want and need.On November 2, Liberia signed a compact with the United States’ Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), which will contribute significant resources to rebuilding the Mt. Coffee hydropower plant and to upgrading maintenance of Liberia’s road transportation network. This $256 million partnership compact is remarkable for a number of reasons. Very few countries each year are approved for a Compact, and in most cases it takes years of negotiation and preparation before a Compact is actually signed. The fact that this Compact was signed in one of the fastest time frames undertaken by MCC is a testament to the dedication and professionalism of the Liberian government and to the robust friendship that has been a hallmark of U.S-Liberia bilateral relations for more than a century. This Compact is a very tangible symbol of our friendship and more importantly will contribute enormously to making affordable electricity available to all Liberians. Let’s be honest. Challenges to development remain. Even as Liberia began to emerge from the Ebola epidemic, its recovery stalled due a sharp decline in revenues from iron ore and rubber; a sharp reminder of the need to move more aggressively away from a concessions-based economy. There has been progress in developing public financial management systems that will make official corruption more difficult going forward, but there is no substitute for holding people accountable – and not just members of the government. The fight against corruption has to begin with personal responsibility of each and every Liberian – to do the right thing every time, especially when no one is looking.Liberia still needs to ensure women have every opportunity to participate fully in the country’s economic and political life. If you leave behind 50 percent of the population, you’ll never fully develop. Incidents of rape and sexual and gender-based violence continue to plague the country, and remain a stain on the country. Although strides are being made, the courts are still backlogged with cases, leading many to forego their right to a fair trial. This also undercuts efforts at national reconciliation, since disputes fester and explode, rather than being dealt with in a fair, just manner. The upcoming transition is perhaps the most critical in Liberia’s history. The 2017 election will show Liberians and the world whether they intend to remain on a path of democracy and inclusion or to return to a time of conflict and exclusion. Protecting the peace and achieving the future that Liberians desire requires personal and collective effort and a commitment to national, rather than personal benefit.It is my fervent hope that even more positive developments are imminent. The United States stands ever-ready to help Liberians help themselves, and I am pleased to have been the steward of this partnership during my time here. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Rev. Sandy as Pontius Pilate

first_imgIt was the English philosopher Francis Bacon who, in one of his essays, penned, “What is truth, asked jesting Pilate, but would not wait for an answer.”That was one of the questions which the Roman Governor of Judaea, Pontius Pilate, asked Jesus during His trial just before His crucifixion. Jesus then spoke about truth, provoking Pilate’s famous question, “What is truth?”Jesus, we all know, was quite capable of answering that question. But was Pilate truly interested in an answer? No. He quickly ordered a pan of water and washed his hands, demonstrating—or so he thought—that he had nothing to do with what was to happen to the Lord of Life. But go read the Apostle’s Creed, which clearly states the historic, inescapable fact: “He (Jesus) suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried.”That is exactly what would happen to Liberians were we to elect a man like the Rev. Kennedy Sandy president of this beleaguered republic—why?Because the man is not president yet; indeed far from it, yet he feels he can say anything to us, make all kinds of spurious and unsubstantiated promises and, to quote Bacon, “not wait,” in Sandy’s case, for a single question.In other words, if and when he is elected president—God help us!—the Rev. Mr. Sandy would say and do anything, and feel he owes us no answers, no explanations, no proofs and no substantiation.That was exactly what the reverend—reverend of what? we may ask—did two Fridays ago. He convened a program and announced his intention, for the second time, to seek the Liberian presidency.In an address to his partisans and the media, he outlined in insipid (bland, unexciting) fashion many of the country’s problems, which he promised to fix. And as though he felt and knew he was talking to a bunch of fools or foolish captives, he gave not a single explanation of how.Yes, Sandy probably forgot that he was addressing not simply his gullible partisans, but also the media, whose professional responsibility it is to ASK questions.Alas, neither the media nor anyone else in the audience was favored with such a privilege from the man who says he wants to be our “redeemer.”As one who calls himself “Reverend Sandy,” people are quick to ask what kind of theology did he study or learn, that allows him to be called “Reverend?” For as a spokesperson for the Christian ministry, like Peter, Paul and the four Gospel writers, and Jesus Himself, Kennedy should have known that theworld’s Redeemer, Jesus Christ, explained everything about His messianic mission. And not only that—Jesus also demonstrated, through His many miracles, HOW His disciples and every one of us, His followers, are to use power. Jesus, yes, was asked many questions by the Scribes and Pharisees, who were bitterly against Him, by ordinary people, like the rich young fool, as well as theprominent, like Nicodemus, who came to Jesus by night. And we all know Jesus’ own disciples asked Him many questions.We also know that the Master took time to answer each question. He often answered a question by posing to the asker another question, just to make the answer plain and simple for all to understand. Alas, the Rev. Mr. Sandy totally forgot—or did he ever learn—what Jesus had done in His three-year ministry—going about doing good, and even from age 12, “asking and answering questions.”What did Rev. Kennedy Sandy expect the media, whom he had invited to his program, to do? Only to listen, then go and regurgitate (vomit) his utterances to the Liberian public and the world? That would have been the height of media irresponsibility—failure to explain what Sandy really meant and, more important, HOW he would do the many things he had promised to do if elected president.The reverend abandoned the example of Jesus, and only spewed out a cacophony (loudness) of utterances and promises and, like Pilate, “would not wait” for a single question!No, the media were simply expected to ignore their professional duty to tell the people the true meaning of Sandy’s utterances and, more important, the HOW—how would he fix the nation’s agriculture, education, health, etc.The media’s only role, according to the Rev. Mr. Sandy, was to spew out to the Liberian public and the world what he had to say. Is this the Pontius Pilate who wants to be our President?Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

US$19K Modern Market Erected in Wroto Town

first_imgMontserrado County District #9 now has something to be happy about after a US$19,800 market building was constructed and subsequently turned over to the market leadership of the district.The market was erected by Atty. Miller B. Catakaw, a prominent citizen in the district.Dedicating the building on December 30, Atty. Catakaw joyously told the gathering that for too long he has seen the marketers experience difficulty selling their produce during the rainy and dry seasons.He said it was time for them to leave the sun and rain for a modern market building.“For years you people have suffered selling on rainy and sunny days. You will no more experience those unfavorable conditions,” declared Atty. Catakaw, to a huge applause from the crowd.“This is the beginning of my development initiatives in the district and I am going to ensure that other communities in the district enjoy similar facilities,” he promised.Besides the market, Catakaw has undertaken several other development projects including the construction of an elementary school building, several bridges and toilets in District #9.Responding, Victoria Solee, superintendent of the market, lauded Atty. Catakaw for the new market building.“Since the establishment of this market in 1975, this is the first time for us to own a market building, “Madam Solee disclosed.“What you have done for us today we cannot pay you back; it is only our Almighty God that knows our heart who will reward you for taking us from under the sun and the rain, from which many of us have suffered serious sickness.”Solee called on marketers to ‘open their eyes’ in the coming 2017 presidential and legislative elections.“If you do not have eyes or ears it is time for you to have them. It is time for you to put people into office that are concerned about your wellbeing,” Solee said, and encouraged her market members to vote wisely.“It is time for us to vote wisely, it is time for you to explain to your children about what you have witnessed here today,” she added.The dedication ceremony was graced by many community residents most of whom were seeing a new market building in their community for the first time.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Commissioner Sam Karnue Takes Office

first_imgMr. Karnue accompanied by a crowd of well-wishers. First Liberian Baha’i promises to serve with humilityFor the first time in Liberia Sam Karnue, a Baha’i, has been inducted into office as Commissioner of Yarpea Mah Administrative District in Nimba County.Members of the Baha’i faith do not campaign for any position neither do they lobby or impress an appointment power, to allow them serve in government, but accept appointments void of political influence and class system.Commissioner Karnue receives the gable of authority from Inspector Reginald MehnMr. Karnue, whose appointment came as a surprise to many of his acquaintances, accepted President George Weah’s call to serve his people, who have longed over the years for a leadership that will unite them.In his acceptance remark on Saturday, June 9, in Duo Tiayee, where he was inducted, Karnue promised to serve his people with humility, passion, love and work, to unite not only the people of Yarpea Mah, but the entire county.“It is my prayer that unity abides with us as a people while we work together in the best interest of our district Nimba, which is a political subdivision of our country Liberia. It is even my best wish that what we do here to live in perfect peace and harmony impacts the lives of others in counties near and far,” he said, assuring the residents that his leadership will be a sound and harmonious one free from prejudice of all forms and sectionalism.“As I consider this a call for service, it is also of my numerous expectations that we consider respecting each other, regardless of origin or position, as a means of collectively achieving our developmental goals,” Karnue told the locals.He outlined truthfulness, humility, trustworthiness, patience and punctuality as pathways to success and improvement in one’s life.Quoting from the Baha’i text which says “the well-being of humanity, its peace and security are unattainable unless and until its unity is firmly established,” Karnue, a Baha’i by faith, called on his predecessor Fred N. Gaye to offer his expertise in helping the new leadership succeed.He said his appointment came not by means of lobby, neither any political engagement, “because I did not wish neither pray for this. I did not rob anybody of anything to get this appointment. In fact, I was in Sierra Leone on Baha’i duty when I received a call that I had been preferred to serve as district commissioner for Yarpea Mah,” Karnue said.Nimba County Inspector Reginald Mehn advised Mr. Karnue to be a leader with new eyes, ears and nose and whose job will always be above sentiments and personal feelings.Mehn, who performed the task on behalf of the county’s superintendent David Dorr Cooper, called on Mr. Karnue not to give credence to gossips, because doing so destroys any leadership.“You have come to serve people of diverse backgrounds. There are people here who still practice the Poro and the Sande societies, while others do not. Please respect the cultural practices of your people and be a leader for all, regardless of place of origin and class system,” Mehn said.Former Commissioner Fred N. Gaye considers Karnue as his friend and brother, whose developmental agenda he is set to assist in order for it to succeed. He referred to Yarpea Mah District as the only common denominator they all have to protect from acts of division.He expressed his gratitude to former President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf for allowing him to serve his people over the years.The induction ceremony was characterized by presentation of gifts giving and traditional dances.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more