Apple just unveiled a new iPod Touch — the first update in

Apple Inc. introduced a new iPod Touch Tuesday, showing support for a product that hadn’t been updated in four years after long being overshadowed by the iPhone.The new model will be priced starting at US$199, or $249 in Canada, and will contain Apple’s own A10 processor, allowing for a better gaming experience and new augmented reality features for the product, as well as Group FaceTime chat, Apple said. How the Apple Store lost its lustre Apple’s new product launch continues with updated AirPods ahead of March 25 event Apple’s hardware blitz continues as it rolls out first update to the iMac desktop in almost two years Apple hadn’t updated the iPod since 2015, and the enhancements will support Apple’s new services, such as Apple News+, Apple Arcade for games and Apple TV+, due to hit later this fall with original programming. Apple is increasingly counting on services to drive growth as sales of the iPhone slip. Fans of the Touch appreciate being able to access most of Apple’s apps and content without being tied to a phone subscription. The new lower price makes it less expensive than an iPad, which start at US$329.The original iPod arrived in 2001. It wasn’t the first digital music player but it upended the music industry and put 1,000 songs in people’s pockets. The shuffle hit the market in 2005 as the first iPod with faster flash storage and without a screen, while the nano was introduced later in the year as a replacement for the then-popular iPod mini. Both went through several redesigns in their early years before being supplanted by the iPhone.Bloomberg.com read more

Athletics Director moves to new business development role

Robert Hilson will be leaving the office of Director of Athletics next month to take on a new assignment as the University’s inaugural Director of Business Development and Partnerships.Tom Arkell, Associate Vice-President of University Services, said the new position will focus on advancing sponsorships and new business development, as well as marketing the wide range services and facilities within the University Services division. University Services operates such units as Dining Services, Residences, Parking Services, Conference & Event Services, Printing & Digital Services, Youth University and Athletics & Recreation.“Universities are moving in this direction, looking to generate more revenue from their existing assets,” said Arkell, “and Robert is well positioned to help get us to the next level in that respect.”Hilson joined Brock as Director of Athletics in 2011. During his tenure he developed the department’s first strategic plan, significantly grew revenue and oversaw five national varsity athletics championships (second in Ontario).Chris Critelli will serve as Interim Director of Athletics while a search is conducted for a full-time replacement. Critelli, currently Assistant Director of Athletics, is a former Canadian Olympian basketball player and a familiar figure at Brock, having served as a coach and administrator in Athletics for 32 years. read more

Hamilton pair face charges after police find 270K worth of drugs

A man and woman from the Hamilton Mountain face several charges in a drug investigation.Members of Hamilton Police executed a search warrant at a home near Upper Wentworth St. and Fennell Ave. E on June 7 around 4:30 p.m.Inside, officers found a slew of drugs including cocaine, crystal meth and fentanyl among many others.Police say the total value of the drugs seized is approximately $270,000.They also seized ammunition and Canadian currency exceeding $10,000.A 25-year-old man and 24-year-old woman, both from Hamilton, were arrested.Both face numerous drug charges. read more

Verizon 2Q Earnings Snapshot

NEW YORK (AP) _ Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ) on Thursday reported second-quarter profit of $3.94 billion.On a per-share basis, the New York-based company said it had net income of 95 cents. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring costs, were $1.23 per share.The results exceeded Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 19 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.20 per share.The largest U.S. cellphone carrier posted revenue of $32.07 billion in the period, missing Street forecasts. Eighteen analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $32.4 billion.Verizon shares have declined almost 2% since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 index has climbed 19%. The stock has risen almost 7% in the last 12 months._____This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on VZ at https://www.zacks.com/ap/VZae???The Associated Press read more

Deadly Dorian pounds relentlessly at desperate Bahamas

FREEPORT, Bahamas — Hurricane Dorian came to a catastrophic daylong halt over the northwest Bahamas, flooding the islands of Abaco and Grand Bahama with walls of water that lapped into the second floors of buildings, trapped people in attics and drowned the Grand Bahama airport under 6 feet of water. At least five people died and 21 injured people were airlifted to the capital by the U.S. Coast Guard, Bahamas officials said.“We are in the midst of a historic tragedy,” Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said. “The devastation is unprecedented and extensive.”Winds and rain continued to pound the northwest islands late Monday night into early Tuesday, sending people fleeing the floodwaters from one shelter to another.“This is unprecedented,” said Jeff Masters, meteorology director at Weather Underground. “We’ve never had a Category 5 stall for so long in the Atlantic hurricane record.”Hundreds of thousands of people in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina were ordered to evacuate before the storm rolls up the Eastern Seaboard, bringing the possibility of life-threatening storm-surge flooding even if the storm’s heart stays offshore, as forecast. Several large airports announced closures and many flights were cancelled for Monday and Tuesday.The U.S. Coast Guard airlifted at least 21 people injured on Abaco Island, which Dorian hit on Sunday with sustained winds of 185 mph (295 kph) and gusts up to 220 mph (355 kph), a strength matched only by the Labor Day hurricane of 1935, before storms were named. Scientists say climate change generally has been fueling more powerful and wetter storms and the only recorded storm more powerful than Dorian was Hurricane Allen in 1980, with 190 mph (305 kph) winds, though it did not make landfall at that strength.Abaco and Grand Bahama, neither much more than 40 feet (12 metres) above sea level at their highest points, are home to some 70,000 people.Bahamian officials said they received a “tremendous” number of calls from people in flooded homes. One radio station said it received more than 2,000 distress messages, including reports of a 5-month-old baby stranded on a roof and a woman with six grandchildren who cut a hole in a roof to escape rising floodwaters. At least two designated storm shelters flooded.Dorian killed one person in Puerto Rico, at the start of its path through the Caribbean.Minnis said many homes and buildings were severely damaged or destroyed, but it was too early to say how much the rebuilding effort would cost. Choppy brown floodwaters reached roofs and the top of palm trees on Monday.Parliament member Iram Lewis told The Associated Press his greatest fear was that waters would keep rising overnight and that stranded people would lose contact with officials as cellphone batteries died.“It is scary,” he said, adding that Grand Bahama’s airport was 6 feet (almost 2 metres) underwater and that people were moving shelters as floodwaters kept surging. “We’re definitely in dire straits.”The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Dorian was expected to start moving slowly to the west-northwest overnight while continuing to pound Grand Bahama Island into the morning.The Center said the track would carry the storm “dangerously close to the Florida east coast late Tuesday through Wednesday evening and then move dangerously close to the Georgia and South Carolina coasts on Wednesday night and Thursday.”While it was expected to stay offshore, meteorologist Daniel Brown cautioned that “only a small deviation” could draw the storm’s dangerous core toward land.By midnight, the storm’s top sustained winds had dipped to 130 mph (215 kph) but it remained almost stationary. It was centred 25 miles (40 kilometres) northeast of Freeport — roughly the same distance from the city as at 9 a.m. Hurricane-force winds extended out as far as 45 mph (75 kilometres) in some directions.A mandatory evacuation of entire South Carolina coast took effect Monday covering about 830,000 people, and transportation officials reversed all lanes of Interstate 26 from Charleston to head inland earlier than planned after noticing traffic jams from evacuees and vacationers heading home on Labor Day, Gov. Henry McMaster said.A few hours later, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp ordered mandatory evacuations for that state’s Atlantic coast, also starting at midday Monday.Authorities in Florida also ordered some mandatory evacuations.FlightAware.com reported that that airlines had cancelled 1,361 flights within, into or out of the US by Monday afternoon — vastly above an average day — with Fort Lauderdale International the most affected, and airlines had already cancelled 1,057 flights for Tuesday, many involving Orlando, Fort Lauderdale and Miami airports.A hurricane watch was in effect for Florida’s East Coast from Deerfield Beach north to South Santee River in South Carolina. A storm surge watch was extended northward to South Santee River in South Carolina. Lake Okeechobee was under a tropical storm watch.A National Guard official, John Anderson, said many people were complying with the evacuation orders.“We have not seen much resistance at all,” he said.___Coto reported from San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Weissenstein from Nassau, Bahamas. Associated Press journalists Tim Aylen in Freeport and Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.Ramon Espinosa, DáNica Coto And Michael Weissenstein, The Associated Press read more