Celtics Jared Sullinger Suspended One Game For Domestic Abuse

The Boston Celtics have decided to suspend forward Jared Sullinger for one game for a domestic violence arrest he was involved in on Sept. 3, the team announced Tuesday.The team’s statement reads: “The Boston Celtics announced today that they have suspended forward Jared Sullinger one game for his role in an incident that occurred on August 31, 2013. The suspension will be served during the team’s game at Toronto on October 30, 2013.‘Jared’s case was dismissed yesterday in Waltham District Court,’ said Celtics President of Basketball Operations Danny Ainge. ‘While we are satisfied that this was the correct ruling, we are suspending Jared for one game because he failed to meet the high expectations we have for all Celtics employees.’The team will have no further comment on this matter.”Sullinger will miss Bostons’ opener in Toronto on Wednesday night.The domestic abuse charges were dropped Monday. read more

The Astros Are Making A Historic Turnaround

The Houston Astros came out of nowhere. Just two seasons after occupying the basement of the American League West, the Astros have returned to take the top spot. Their turnaround is so sizable and so swift that it’s historic.In 2014, the Astros finished fourth in the division, with a correspondingly putrid winning percentage of .432. This year, the Astros are projected1Using FanGraphs’ projected standings. I am using the projected standings to take into account that the Astros’ performance is likely to regress somewhat. to end with a .530 winning percentage, sixth-best in the majors. Turnarounds like that don’t happen often, but they do happen: Since 1950, only 114 teams (7.2 percent of the total number) have managed to increase their winning percentage by .100 or more over the course of a single season.2I am using data from Sean Lahman’s database. The 2013 World Series-winning Boston Red Sox managed it, as did the 2014 Los Angeles Angels.3Notably, both of these teams had been quite good two years before, implying that their improved winning percentages were returns to their expected level of play. That statement holds generally: The teams that improved their winning percentage by .100 or more had a .478 winning percentage two years prior, much better than the Astros’ woeful mark (.315). We’d expect to see a couple of teams every year bump their winning percentage by a similar margin.The Astros’ turnaround becomes historic, however, when you look at how bad they were two years ago. In 2013, the Astros finished 51-111, good for a .315 winning percentage and the bottom of the division. The team was not felled by injuries or misfortune — it was genuinely terrible in every phase of the game. The Astros’ hitters racked up 1.4 wins above replacement (WAR) — 29th in the league — and their pitchers totaled 1.2 — 30th in the league. That’s what happens when your team is essentially replacement level. A team full of anonymous, AAA types who couldn’t make it in the major leagues would have been projected to finish at a winning percentage of .294, barely worse than the Astros’ actual performance.If the projection for this season holds, the Astros will have increased their winning percentage by .200 over two years. Since 1950, that kind of reversal has happened a grand total of seven times — and when it has, it’s usually because a decent team has gotten radically better. The 2001 Seattle Mariners assembled a historic juggernaut of a team that won 71.6 percent of its games after winning 48.8 percent two years earlier. The team before the Mariners to accomplish this feat, the 1995 Cleveland Indians, became a 100-win team from a borderline contender. Only one team — the 1963 Philadelphia Phillies — had a starting winning percentage as poor as the Astros did at the end of their 2013 season.It’s still early in the season, and the Astros likely won’t finish as well as they have started. That doesn’t mean, though, that the Astros’ current winning percentage (.625) is founded purely on luck. They have one of the best run differentials in the league, scoring 28 more runs than they’ve allowed.4According to Russell Carleton’s work at Baseball Prospectus, run differential doesn’t stabilize until 70 games have been played. But such a strong differential does portend positive things for the Astros, even if the sample size is not yet large enough to be certain. The Astros aren’t getting terribly lucky in terms of their batting average on balls in play (BABIP), either offensively (.278, good for 24th in the league) or defensively (.283, also 24th). They have been a little bit lucky in terms of clustering their hits, but even if we remove that, they’d have earned a .576 winning percentage so far, good for fourth in the league.Most teams that accomplished turnarounds like the Astros’ did so on the basis of vastly improved play — both on offense and defense. On average, teams that saw their winning percentage improve by .100 year to year were helped by their offenses putting up .46 more runs per game and their defense allowing .54 fewer runs per game. The Astros are doing just as well. Their runs per game have improved by .55 relative to last year, and their runs allowed per game have declined by .61. In other words, this kind of improvement is no fluke.The Astros have built their team on a combination of savvy trades (outfielder Jake Marisnick), high draft picks (right fielder George Springer) and an eye for talent disregarded by other teams (second baseman Jose Altuve and starting pitcher Collin McHugh). Guys like McHugh offer an insight into the front office’s analytics-heavy approach. McHugh was acquired not because of his results but because the spin on his curveball suggested that he could become a success.As with any turnaround, however, luck does play a role. Indeed, projection systems are relatively unchanged in their opinion of the Astros despite their success. FanGraphs’ Steamer projection pegs them as a roughly .500 team going forward, and Baseball Prospectus’s PECOTA is even less optimistic.But all those wins in the bank mean that even if they regress, the Astros stand a good chance at making the playoffs for the first time since 2005. Both projections tab them as better-than-even to get into the postseason, and their unexpectedly exceptional play may convince the front office to make further improvements to the roster.One of the most optimistic parallels for the Astros’ recent success comes from the last team to increase its winning percentage by .200 in two years: the 2008 Tampa Bay Rays. Like the Astros, those Rays were coming from the basement, riding a wave of young talent gathered by a recently installed, sabermetrically advanced front office. For the Rays, 2008’s turnaround was the beginning of an impressive run that saw them make the playoffs in four of six years (getting all the way to the World Series in 2008).If those Rays are any guide, we may be witnessing the rise of a new contender — one that will be competitive in the AL West for several years. This may be the last year the Astros sneak up on people. read more

Mens soccer OSU hopes to find a winning path versus Oakland

Senior forward Danny Jensen advances the ball down the field against a UC Santa Barbara defender. Credit: Ohio State AthleticsAfter losing its past four games, the Ohio State men’s soccer team returns to Columbus looking to string together some wins at the tail end of its season. The Buckeyes will take on Oakland University at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium this Tuesday, the start of a two-game stretch at home. OSU fell victim to undefeated No. 1 Maryland on Friday night. Despite losing 2-0, coach John Bluem was impressed with how his team performed.  “That’s a real tough environment to play in. To be down early and not give up and battle like they did for the remaining 70 minutes was a great effort,” Bluem said. “In the second half we outshot them and out corner-kicked them. We made some adjustments and I think we played really well overall. I was really proud of our guys.”The Buckeyes have hit a bit of a drought in the scoring department — not scoring any goals in their last two contests. As a result, the game plan is going to have to change through the team’s remaining six games. “We are definitely going to have to be more aggressive moving forward,” said senior midfielder Henry Chancy. “The time for sitting back is no more. We have to go after every team and get them on their heels. We have nothing to lose now.”Oakland comes in struggling, much like the Buckeyes. At 4-6 on the season, the Golden Grizzlies had won three straight before losing their past two contests. Oakland’s leading scorer is redshirt senior Chase Jabbori, who has netted three goals on only 10 shots through the team’s first 10 games. Jabbori is tied in points with redshirt freshman Nebojsa Popovic and junior Austin Ricci, each with two goals and two assists apiece. The Golden Bears have been outscored 13-10 on the season, splitting time between two of their goalkeepers. Redshirt sophomore Zach Walker has gotten the bulk of the work, starting in 10 games while making 25 saves. For the Buckeyes, it was announced Friday that Tyler Kidwell and Danny Jensen were named candidates for the 2016 Senior CLASS Award. The award is given to a Division I senior that has notable achievements in four different areas: community, classroom, character and competition. “They are both really good leaders, strong students and great players,” Bluem said. “It says a lot for our university that we are producing these kinds of student athletes. I am happy for the two of them and proud of both of them. “The OSU men’s soccer program has had the past two award winners, with Alex Ivanov and Zach Mason taking home the award in 2014 and 2015, respectively. While excelling off the field, if the Buckeyes want to excel on the field, they know they must build off their performance against Maryland. “If we keep fighting like that and play the way we did, we can get on a hot streak and show that even though we don’t have everyone healthy right now, it’s still possible for us to make a good run,” said junior defender Hunter Robertson. “This next game is crucial for us.”Players and coaches alike understand that with just six games remaining on the schedule, they must put the past behind them and focus on the task at hand, even in games that are out of conference. “We can’t have a letdown because it’s a nonconference game,” Bluem said. “We have to play with intensity right from the start. We are going to treat this game as if it’s a conference opponent out there. We are going to keep doing what we do well and hopefully we catch some breaks and get some wins.” read more

Big Ten play brings new challenge for Buckeyes

The Ohio State football team’s season changes Saturday as it enters Big Ten play against Illinois. “It’s going to be a battle every week,” defensive lineman Cameron Heyward said. “The Big Ten is very physical, very smash-mouth, and we have a lot we have to improve on if we want to be Big Ten champions.” If the team accomplishes that goal, it will win a record sixth-straight Big Ten crown. The significance is not lost on the players. “It’s the Big Ten,” wide receiver DeVier Posey said. “It means a lot and we take that very seriously in the locker room and very seriously around the Woody (Hayes Athletic Center).” With the start of Big Ten play also comes the first road game for OSU. “It’s exciting to go on the road,” Coach Jim Tressel said. “We lose many of the advantages we’ve had for the last four games … but our guys like challenges and I think they’re anxious to get on the road.” Some players emphasized the importance of focus in games away from the Horseshoe. “It’s just a matter of going in, knowing that things might be a little different in preparation, but when we get on the field it’s going to be the same,” kicker Devin Barclay said. Others pointed to the importance of experience and leadership. “We have a veteran group, so you know we have guys that have traveled before,” Posey said. “I feel like Coach Tressel and the coaching staff have done a great job preparing us for all types of elements.” Lack of preparation might have been a factor in the Buckeyes’ only Big Ten loss last season against Purdue in West Lafayette, Ind. OSU entered that game ranked No. 7 in the country and lost 26-18 to the unranked Boilermakers. “We won’t talk about Purdue,” Tressel said. “You would hope those (players) … would still have the understanding very deep in their soul that you better be prepared when you’re on the road.” Whether at home or on the road, the team knows every game in the Big Ten is important. “With the Big Ten coming, you can’t take nothing for granted,” running back Jordan Hall said. “One slip and our dreams are gone.” Coaches and players are looking forward to the challenge. “Now we’re just getting ready to start the rough period, and that will really determine if we can maintain,” Tressel said. “I feel confident we can, but we’ll have to see.” Quarterback Terrelle Pryor is excited about tackling the difficult task ahead. “The fun starts this week,” he said. read more

NCAA reinstates Ohio State footballs Brown Hall and Howard

The NCAA on Tuesday reinstated Ohio State football defensive back Corey Brown, junior running back Jordan Hall and junior defensive back Travis Howard, according to an athletic department release. The release said that the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff decided the players can play after repaying $200 to a charity. Brown, Hall and Howard received white envelopes containing $200 from a university booster at Feb. 19 charity event in Cleveland. “The university appreciates the NCAA’s expeditious response in reinstating these three student athletes,” OSU athletics director Gene Smith said in the release. The release, sent by OSU spokesman Dan Wallenberg, also said: “Reinstatement decisions are independent of the NCAA enforcement process and typically are made once the facts of the student-athlete’s involvement are determined. This is typically well in advance of infractions decisions. The enforcement investigation into the Ohio State University is ongoing.” With Brown, Hall and Howard sidelined by suspension, the Buckeyes began their 2011 season with a 42-0 victory against Akron in the Sept. 3 season opener, as well as a 27-22 win against Toledo on Saturday. Dan Herron, DeVier Posey, Mike Adams and Solomon Thomas, who each sold OSU football memorabilia and received improper benefits in the form of tattoos, will remain suspended until the team’s Oct. 8 game at Nebraska. The Buckeyes will next travel to Miami for a Saturday game against the Miami Hurricanes (0-1) at Sun Life Stadium. The 7:30 p.m. game will be televised nationally on ESPN. read more

Ohio State football considering moving some fall camp practices off Woody Hayes

The Ohio State football team is considering moving some of its fall camp practices away from the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. Athletic department spokesman Jerry Emig confirmed to The Lantern that while nothing is definitive, a move to an off-site location is being considered. “I’m not sure exactly of the location, though,” Emig said. The Buckeyes’ first fall camp under coach Urban Meyer is slated to begin held Aug. 3, just less than a month before the team’s first game against Miami (Ohio). read more

Ohio State womens volleyball set to welcome Big Ten newcomers Maryland Rutgers

OSU sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe watches the ball during a match against Penn State on Oct. 31 at St. John Arena. OSU lost, 3-0.Credit: Kelly Roderick / For The LanternAfter playing the majority of its games on the road this season, the No. 18 Ohio State women’s volleyball team looks to defend St. John Arena against Big Ten newcomers Maryland and Rutgers.Of the 24 matches played by OSU this season, only eight outings, including three tournament matchups, have been played in Columbus this year.Sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe said she’s glad the team doesn’t have to travel as much, and added that the Buckeyes need to approach every game with the same mindset.“It’ll be a lot nicer being able to stay home, not traveling as much (and) obviously having a home court advantage too,” Sandbothe said. “But I mean, we’re road warriors, as well as being home warriors.”The Buckeyes (16-8, 7-5) are scheduled to play the Terrapins (9-14, 2-10) on Friday and the Scarlet Knights (7-18, 0-12) on Saturday.The majority of Buckeye juniors and seniors, with the exception of junior middle blocker Tyler Richardson, as she is a transfer from Middle Tennessee State, have experience playing the Terrapins. The Buckeyes played Maryland in invitational play during the 2011-12 and 2012-13 seasons. The Scarlet Knights and the Buckeyes haven’t played one another since the 1981 season.Junior transfer outside hitter Elizabeth Campbell has the most experience playing the Terrapins, as she faced them two times as a player at Duke.“Maryland’s a very scrappy team and they fight very hard,” Campbell said. “They have really good pin hitters.”She added that if the Buckeyes “scrap and play defensive as hard as (Maryland does),” they can come out with a win.In her career against the Terrapins, she has averaged 12 kills, 7 digs, an assist and a service ace per game.The Terrapins and Scarlet Knights come into Columbus at the bottom of the Big Ten, but have made strides compared to last season.The Scarlet Knights are also the only Big Ten team without a win in conference play this season.The Terrapins will be led by senior outside hitter Ashleigh Crutcher, who ranks seventh in the Big Ten in kills per set with an average of 3.55, while the Scarlet Knights will be led by junior defensive specialist Ali Schroeter, who ranks fifth in the Big Ten in digs per set with an average of 4.39.Both matches are scheduled for a 7 p.m. start. read more

Stressed GP allowed to keep job despite driving home after drinking almost

first_imgEarlier, the doctor – who ran a medical practice in Hartlepool, in Co Durham, and was also director of Hartlepool and District Hospice – had been seen driving erratically along busy main roads during his 22-mile commute home.He was seen braking and speeding up for no apparent reason and “swerving across the road narrowly missing other vehicles”.Another driver followed the GP home due to concerns over his driving and called police while Peverley parked his car on the driveway of his £500,000 house in Nunthorpe, near Middlesbrough. The doctor was later given a suspended jail term and a three-year driving ban.At the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service, Peverley – who has not worked since his arrest – admitted misconduct charges but escaped with a six-month suspension after claiming he was suffering from “accumulated stress caused by professional and financial problems”. He will undergo a review in June where it is expected he will ask to be allowed to treat patients again.Much of the Manchester hearing was held in private after lawyers for Peverley argued there was “no particular public interest in his financial arrangements”. The drink driving incident occurred at 6.50pm on April 15 last year after the GP bought a 70cl bottle of vodka during his lunch break and then had two doubles before consulting patients.He drank three-quarters of the bottle while completing paperwork before driving home.Peverley was breathalysed at the police station where the lowest reading was 153 microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath. The legal limit is 35mg. Later that month, he admitted drink-driving at Teeside magistrates’ court and was banned from driving for 36 months, given an eight-week prison sentence suspended for 12 months and ordered to pay £115 charges and £85 costs.The GP voluntarily referred himself to the GMC for a disciplinary hearing. A GP who drove home after drinking almost an entire bottle of vodka at his surgery has been allowed to keep his job after medical watchdogs heard he was stressed at looking after 3,500 patients.Dr Martin Peverley, 51, had been drinking doubles in between treating patients and completing paperwork and was so drunk that police had to carry him to their patrol car when they confronted him outside his home.The family doctor, who was four times the drink-drive limit, could barely speak when officers tried to talk to him following his 50-minute journey home and he was too intoxicated to get out of the driver’s seat, a hearing was told.As officers attempted to remove him from his car, Peverley fell to the ground then had to be lifted into the police vehicle and taken to the station where he was ordered to take a breath test. Peverley’s lawyer Jonathan Holl-Allen said his client had been under “significant professional pressure” because for two years he had undertaken sole responsibility for the medical practice – which has 3,500 patients – following the retirement of the other GP partner.He said the GP, who qualified in 1990 and joined the surgery in 2005, was also under “financial pressures” because a misunderstanding over funding from NHS England led to the practice incurring considerable debts in fees for locum doctors.Apologising for his drink-driving, Peverley himself admitted making a “very serious error of judgement, but said his actions were out of character and occurred against a background of “accumulating stress, caused by professional and financial problems, which had come to a head.” He said he had taken “steps” to deal with his bouts of stress and his wife was standing by him. Tribunal chairman Sean Ell told Peverley: “The actions which led to your conviction were very serious, and had the potential to cause harm to members of the public, but the tribunal did not have any direct allegation of you having caused harm to your patients.”The tribunal noted that you were under significant professional pressure at the time of the incident, having been solely responsible, following the retirement of your GP partner, for 3,500 patients at your surgery for over two years without consistent support from a permanent second GP.”It is clear that on the day of your arrest that you displayed an extreme and concerning reaction to the pressures upon you, consuming a significant amount of alcohol in a short period of time whilst at your workplace, and then driving home with the obvious potential to cause serious harm to the public.” Dr Martin Peverley leaving his hearing at the General Medical Council in Manchestercenter_img Dr Martin Peverley leaving his hearing at the General Medical Council in ManchesterCredit:Pat Isaacs/Cavendish You were under significant professional pressure… having been solely responsible, following the retirement of your GP partner, for 3,500 patients at your surgerytribunal chairman Sean Ell Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

No improvement in heart failure death rates since 1990s

first_imgBoth the incidence and prevalence of heart failure increase steeply with age, with the average age at first diagnosis being 76 and numbers are expected to increase as the population ages.The study was the first to provide survival rate estimates for heart failure in the UK based on the medical records of 54,313 heart failure patients.It found found 81.3 per cent survived for one year, 51.5 per cent survived for five years, and 29.5 per cent survived for 10 years, following diagnosis.Dr Clare Taylor, a primary care researcher said: “Getting an accurate estimate of heart failure prognosis is vital for those who commission healthcare services, so resources can be allocated appropriately.”Perhaps more importantly this allows patients to make more informed choices about treatments and possible end-of-life care.”While the survival rates were better than other studies, we disappointingly didn’t see any improvement over time.”We plan to do more work to examine why this might be the case and find ways to improve the outlook for patients with heart failure in the future.”While the study did not look at the effect of medication following heart failure on survival rates, it found that survival rate estimates vary depending on a person’s age, gender, other health conditions and blood pressure.These are all factors doctors should take into consideration when discussing heart failure with their patients.Professor Sir Nilesh Samani, Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “This is a slightly surprising finding as other similar studies have shown some improvement in the prognosis of patients with heart failure as new evidence-based treatments such as ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers and in selected patients used of defibrillators and pacemakers have become standard practice.“Nonetheless, the study shows how devastating a condition heart failure is, with a prognosis that is still worse than many cancers, and that much more research is needed to improve its outcome.”The BHF are funding major initiatives in this area including its regenerative medicine centres, but we urgently need the public’s support in order to find new ways to treat this devastating condition.”The study was published in the journal Family Practice. By contrast cancer survival rates have doubled in the past 40 years.Heart failure has a poor prognosis and will kill a fifth of those diagnosed within a year, half within two years and two thirds within 10 years.It is a common long-term condition affecting around 900,000 Britons and the second highest cost to the NHS for any disease after stroke.It happens when the heart is unable to pump blood around the body properly with a heart attack, high blood pressure or cardiomyopathy, diseases of the heart muscle, the most common causes.Other triggers are heart valve problems, alcohol or drugs, uncontrolled irregular heart rhythm, congenital heart conditions, a viral infection affecting the heart muscleand some cancer treatments.The condition is incurable and treatment aims to control symptoms for as long as possible and slow down progressionDrugs are prescribed to control blood pressure and help the heart pump while sufferers told to eat healthy, exercise and stop smoking and drinking.Others will be given a pacemaker or ICD. Heart failure still kills the same number of middle-aged Britons as it did nearly two decades ago, a new study warned.While medical advances has slashed the number of Britons dying from cancer, the same has not happened for those suffering from heart failure.The University of Oxford led study found between 1998 and 2012, survival rates for people aged over 45 with heart failure showed no improvement. Survival of heart attacks has improvedCredit:Alamy Cartoon of man with blood We disappointingly didn’t see any improvement over timeDr Clare Taylor, Oxford University Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more