Learn from Joe Biden about raising children

first_imgThose who have followed Biden’s life and career know that he’s no stranger to tragedy. Those who attend and feel startled by how antiquated his folksy, good-humored charm feels in the Trump-era of insult-politics will recognize tragedy, too.As a Navy veteran who began my career at a recruiting depot less than a block away from Proctors, I see one greater tragedy. That is how few people like his son are following him into public service. At a time when fewer and fewer elected officials serve in uniform, Beau Biden deployed to Iraq as his state’s sitting attorney general.When he was offered his father’s Senate seat, he instead opted to finish his work fighting child sexual abuse, confident that the merits of his contributions would elevate him more honorably than his name. He comforted parents who lost children to brain cancer, even as he was dying of it himself.Joe Biden has much to teach us about love, loss and resilience. But we have the most to learn from him on how to raise children that embody public service and are worthy role models for our children to emulate.Nathan BruschiCambridge, Mass. (also of Clifton Park)More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesControversial solar project goes before Clifton Park Planning BoardHigh-risk COVID exposure reported in Clifton ParkEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Joe Biden will speak at Proctors on Nov. 20 about the loss of his son Beau at age 46 to brain cancer and the profound personal grief that followed, preventing him from seeking the presidency in 2016. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Grateful to students who picked up leaves

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Thank you to a wonderful group of Scotia-Glenville students who came on Oct. 28 and raked up all our leaves.Splendid job. They even brought their own leaf bags.Anne Marie McLaughlinScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Government run by the reckless to serve the few

first_imgAnd isn’t it funny, as Alan Blinder, the former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve pointed out in the Wall Street Journal, that so many of the provisions — keeping intact “egregious loopholes for real estate developers,” generously treating “pass through” income, killing the alternative minimum tax, and being kind to heirs — just happen to be particularly good for a certain president of the United States (who claimed he was fighting for the little guy) and for his family.You might find it entertaining that Republicans had to keep rewriting their bill right up to the very last minute, as if they were college sophomores looking at a clock.Senate GOP leaders had to delay a vote and pull an all-nighter when the Senate’s own parliamentarian ruled that a “trigger” provision serving as a fig leaf for supposed deficit hawks was illegitimate.But there is nothing funny about capricious legislating on an artificial deadline created solely to escape accountability.Anyone who supported this bill is endorsing government for the few imposed by the reckless.E.J. Dionne Jr. is a nationally syndicated columnist.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census But the stakes in all these close shaves are relatively low.Not so with Republicans in Congress.They are reordering large parts of the American economy on the fly with little forethought and virtually no debate.True, legislating has been routinely compared with sausage making.It’s an activity you don’t want to watch too closely.But when Congress did truly big things in the past — the Affordable Care Act, the major tax cuts of the Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush eras, the tax increases under Bill Clinton and Barack Obama — there was serious discussion over an extended time.Debate and careful negotiation over tradeoffs in a genuinely bipartisan context was at the heart of the success of the last comprehensive tax reform in 1986. Isn’t there a near universal consensus that investing in the skills of our people and in research is the way to foster growth and future well-being?By tearing away the deductibility of state income and sales taxes, this legislative concoction could either plunge some of our largest states — California, New York and New Jersey among them — into fiscal crises, or force them to slash the help they give their lower income citizens.Does anyone of right mind believe this will be good for our economy, let alone for social justice?Ah, but these states are Democratic, so Republicans are happy to abuse their power to take a shot at their partisan opponents.Even defensible aspects of the bill have not been examined closely to see what impact they will have.For example, it limits the ability of businesses to deduct interest payments from their taxes. There is a case for preferring equity over debt.But I bet that no more than 5 percent of the lawmakers voting on this proposal have thought much about the subject one way or the other. By contrast, the GOP’s extravaganza this year is entirely partisan, full of breaks for favored interests and punishments for those the party regards as its political enemies. To call it “reform” is an affront to generations of good government advocates in both parties.Moreover, this tax monstrosity is so filled with gimmicks, carve-outs and penalties for various sectors of our economy that its impact will be far greater than the earlier Republican tax cuts of the 1980s and early 2000s.Those voting for it have given little thought to how it will affect many sectors of American life. This is exactly what its sponsors wanted. Scrutiny is this bill’s greatest foe.Besides pumping up already dangerous levels of economic inequality, the bill will add at least $1 trillion (and probably much more) to the debt at a moment when adding to deficits serves no useful economic purpose.This, in turn, could lead to interest rate increases that will dampen whatever positive effects the tax cuts in the bill (many of them temporary) will have on growth.It could undermine our system of higher education, which is one of the great prides of our country.What sense does it make to provide relief to heirs who did nothing to earn their inheritances other than be born while increasing taxes on graduate students whose incomes are already modest? Categories: Editorial, OpinionWASHINGTON — Students often leave term papers to the last minute.Repair folks frequently arrive at the far end of the time they promised.And some basketball players don’t turn it on until the fourth quarter.last_img read more

Police showed they had nothing to hide

first_imgIn your May 19 editorial [“Coincidence leads to suspicion”], which is critical of the way the Schenectady Police Department handled the arrest of one its officers for DWI, you close by stating the police ask the public to ignore their common sense. Common sense tells me that if the Schenectady Police Department was trying to hide something, the officer would not have been arrested in the first place. Michael EidensSchenectadyThe writer is the Public Safety commissioner and former County Court judge.  More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Schenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Crest hooks Bartley deal

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Inventing a centre

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Antler to sell its entire portfolio

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Hammersmith offices: Hammer and fickle

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The grand new Duke of Yorks: Cadogan goes marching in

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Offices Boom time again in the West End?

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img