first_imgLast fall, Geoffrey Ling, a top biotechnology research official at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), challenged neuroscientists to do something extraordinary: Develop an implantable device that can restore memory loss in vets with traumatic brain injuries. Offering up to $40 million in short-term, high-stakes funding, Ling said, “Here’s the golden ring—who’s brave enough to step up and actually grab it?”Today, DARPA announced two academic teams that will spend the next 4 years attempting to meet that challenge as part of President Barack Obama’s roughly $110 million Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), will receive up to $15 million to develop a memory-restoring prosthesis that focuses on the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus—brain regions key to memory formation. A second team at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) will receive up to $22.5 million to develop a device that can monitor and modulate many different brain regions involved in memory formation and storage.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Some researchers, however, are skeptical that the efforts will make major headway on such a complicated problem.Both the UCLA team, led by neurosurgeon Itzhak Fried, and the UPenn team, led by neuroscientist Michael Kahana, will start out by studying neuronal activity in people with epilepsy, who are often recruited for brain stimulation studies because they were already treated through open-brain surgery. Fried will build on his earlier work in epileptic patients, which has shown that stimulating the entorhinal cortex improves performance on a computer game that requires players to quickly learn and remember where to drop off taxi passengers in a virtual city. Next, he will use data from those studies to build computational models of how the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus work together to convert daily experiences into lasting memories.Kahana also aims to develop a computational model of memory formation, but using a different approach. By searching the brains of epileptic patients for electrical “biomarkers” of memory retrieval and storage, he hopes to build a program that can detect when memory goes awry and instruct a device to help repair it.The U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California and the device manufacturer Medtronic will also contribute to the efforts, aiming to build neurostimulators at least 10 times smaller than previous devices. Contractual agreements about rights to the technologies are still under way, according to DARPA officials.If successful, the researchers ultimately hope to conduct the first clinical trials of deep brain stimulation in people with traumatic brain injury. That’s a “very achievable and realizable” goal because the teams are building on solid existing research in people and animals, says James Giordano, a neuroscientist at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., who serves as a neuroethics adviser to DARPA’s BRAIN-related efforts.The viability of the DARPA effort will depend greatly on what kind of memory loss people with traumatic brain injury actually have, says Roger Redondo, a neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Memory loss can result from problems with either storage or retrieval, he notes. In the case of a storage problem, the connections that form a memory were either never formed to begin with, or were destroyed, he says. In such cases, “no implantable device is going to help.”On the other hand, if a traumatic injury produces a retrieval problem, in which most of a memory is there, but simply difficult to access, stimulation could potentially be useful, he says. “It is going to be extremely hard,” however, to determine which cells contain the memory and precisely tune electrical stimulation to drive its retrieval, he says. “The complexity of the brain, and the hippocampus, is such that any change in voltage that a microelectrode or chip can apply, even in a tiny area, will affect multitudes of neurons in uncontrolled ways,” he says.Relying too heavily on epilepsy as a model for traumatic brain injury could also be problematic, says neuropsychologist James Sumowski of the Kessler Foundation in West Orange, New Jersey. Although some people with such injuries go on to develop epilepsy, most don’t show the same patterns of abnormal electrical activity or areas of atrophy that epileptic patients do, he says. “They are very different disorders.”On the bright side, such challenges define the kind of “blue-sky, high-risk” project that DARPA is uniquely positioned to take on, Redondo says. Given the 270,000 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars who have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury, nothing less than a major scientific leap is required, says Justin Sanchez, program manager for DARPA’s memory restoration program. As things stand, the options for injured service members “are very few.”*Correction, 11 July, 12:10 p.m.: A previous version of this story attributed the final quote by Justin Sanchez to Geoffrey Ling. The story has been corrected.last_img

admin | 3216976577@qq.com

Related Posts

first_imgLONDON (CMC):Sprint sensation Usain Bolt has given Ireland’s rugby team a boost as they prepare to kick off their World Cup campaign this weekend, squad officials have said.Bolt, the world’s fastest man, had a surprise meeting with the team ahead of its opening World Cup match against Canada in Cardiff on Saturday.Irish hooker Rory Best said the meeting had been “unbelievable” and gave the Ireland team the boost it needed ahead of the campaign.”It was great just to get his thoughts on things,” Best said.The six-time gold medallist had dinner with the Irish squad in London before they lost to England in a friendly last week.Bolt defeated his American rival, Justin Gatlin, twice to win the sprint double at the recent World Championships in Beijing, China, after an injury-disrupted season.”The big thing, from our point of view, was that he says when he goes into championships and he feels good, he knows he’s going to perform,” said Best.”It’s not necessarily about how events leading into it have gone. It is about how he’s feeling himself.”back-to-back defeatsIreland are hoping for a successful World Cup campaign, following two recent back-to-back defeats by Wales and England.”From our point of view, we’re feeling pretty good at the minute. But, obviously, the results over the last two games haven’t gone the way we wanted,” Best said.”He (Bolt) has a lot of self-belief. He knows when he prepares well and is ready, he can perform.”last_img

first_imgP16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC His entry bolsters a gutted Batang Pier backcourt rotation which depended heavily on scorers Stanley Pringle and Jonathan Grey.Javelona will be the latest to join GlobalPort’s hard-knocks guard collection, which already features Nico Elorde, Michael Juico, and Jeff Viernes. ‘Stop romanticizing Pinoy resilience’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Photo from ASEAN Basketball LeaguePao Javelona is taking his act back to the PBA.The stingy defender earned his return ticket to the pro league after his stellar play with San Miguel Alab Pilipinas in its championship run in the 2018 ASEAN Basketball League.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:13New Year: Sydney celebrates start of 2020 under toxic cloud02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feast Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ FEU escapes JRU to stay perfect in Filoil Preseason cup Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident Team manager Bonnie Tan confirmed that GlobalPort signed the 6-foot guard for the remainder of the season.Javelona, 25, was drafted in the third round of the 2016 PBA Draft by Phoenix but was the final cut from the team’s roster for that season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownAfer that, the former NU Bulldog played for Marinerong Pilipino in the PBA D-League before  taking his act to the ABL this past season.Javelona averaged 4.4 points, 2.2 rebounds, and 1.7 assists in 12.2 minutes in the regional league, but upped his game in the playoffs and helped San Miguel Alab Pilipinas win the title over five hard-fought games against Mono Vampire of Thailand. Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew MOST READ View commentslast_img

first_imgFor more information or to make a donation, please contact Tracy Hoffman at 250-785-4429. CORRECTION- Visions of Change not only fundraises to help send students to lend support in foreign countries, it also makes charitable donations of money, supplies and services to those countries.Despite recent confusion, North Peace Secondary School is involved with two non-profit organizations.Along with Visions of Change, students at the school are also involved in the Seeds of Learning Organization. Unlike Visions of change, who raise money to help send students to lend support in foreign countries, Seeds of Learning is dedicated to raising funds strictly for donation purposes.- Advertisement -The foundation helps raise money for education assistance. Specifically, Seeds of Learning helps to provide scholarships and education opportunities for people in Central America.According to Seeds of Learning participant Tracy Hoffman, some people have come to believe that Seeds of Learning has become Visions of Change or are not longer an active foundation. She says this is not the case and that both still do exist in Fort St. John.This article is not intended to give priority to either foundation. Hoffman wants people to know that Seeds of Learning are still working to raise funds and are currently working on upcoming fundraisers to help raise money for this great cause.Advertisementlast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *