TORONTO — The Toronto stock market racked up a solid gain Wednesday amid rising hopes for a strong reading on U.S. job creation as traders also caught up with two positive manufacturing reports that were released while the TSX was closed for Canada Day.Here are the closing numbersTSX — 15,209.79+63.78 0.42%S&P 500 —  1,974.62+1.30 0.07%Dow — 16,976.24+20.17 0.12%Nasdaq — 4,457.73 -0.92 -0.02%Canadian stocks rose a fifth day as the benchmark index rose to an intraday record.The S&P/TSX composite index gained 63.78 points to 15,209.79 after data showed that Chinese manufacturing grew in June for the first time in six months. The gauge closed at record on June 30 and Wednesday surpassed its intraday high of 15,154.77 set on June 6, 2008.In the U.S., the manufacturing sector showed a 13th straight month of growth.The Canadian dollar was up 0.03 of a cent to 93.75 cents US.U.S. indexes put in lacklustre performances but the Dow Jones industrials and the S&P 500 again closed at fresh record highs. The Dow was up 20.17 points to 16,976.24 and the S&P 500 gained 1.3 points to 1,974.62. The Nasdaq was 0.92 of a point lower at 4,457.73.Traders were cautious ahead of the other major economic event for the week — the release Thursday of the U.S. government’s employment report for June.Ahead of that data, U.S. payrolls firm ADP reported that the private sector created 281,000 jobs in June, much higher than the 205,000 reading that had been forecast. That raised hopes the government figures would show the American economy cranked out more than the 210,000 jobs in the public and private sector that economists have forecast.“Clearly, now the market is going to set up for a bullish number,” said Wes Mills, chief investment officer at Scotia Private Client Group.“It does seem risk-on is coming back. People have been reluctant to fully endorse this rally and we know the fears that have popped up, whether it’s Ukraine or China or more recently this Iraq business. But it does seem the market is shaking all of these things off.”In corporate news, JPMorgan Chase chairman and chief executive Jamie Dimon said he has curable throat cancer. Dimon said he plans to remain on the job and be actively involved in key decisions while undergoing treatment. Despite the reassurance, Dimon’s illness could raise leadership concerns at one of the world’s biggest banks. The bank’s shares declined 60 cents to US$56.97.In Canada, shares in Canadian Pacific Railway Limited (TSX:CP) (NYSE:CP) were 10 cents higher to C$193.41 after the carrier was upgraded by equities research analysts at CIBC from a “sector perform” rating to an “outperform” rating. Earlier this week, analysts at Barclays raised their price target on shares of Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. from US$168 to US$196. The shares rose $1.19 to US$181.39 in New York.TSX advancers were led by the base metals component, up 3.85% as July copper gained six cents to US$3.27 a pound. The information technology sector was up 1.21% as BlackBerry (TSX:BB) ran up 45 cents or 4.11% to $11.39. The stock has surged lately, up about 40% in the past month amid strong quarterly financial results and enthusiasm over its new product. BlackBerry’s Passport, which meets somewhere between a smartphone and a tablet in size, is scheduled to launch in Europe this September.The gold sector shook off early declines to move up 0.2% while August bullion rose $4 to US$1,330.60 an ounce.The energy sector was ahead 0.3% with August crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange down 86 cents to a three-week low of US$105.08 a barrel. Prices had drifted higher to almost US$107 in June amid a growing insurgency in Iraq, but have since fallen the fighting has stayed well away from the south where most of Iraq’s oil production is located.With files from BloombergTOP STORIESCanadian dollar moves above 94 cents to 2014 high, but rally seen as short livedFed boss says rate moves not the way to address ‘pockets of increased risk-taking’ in financial systemFacebook investigated after manipulating users’ emotions in news feed study without consentMove over, oil sands: Shale powers rebound in deals for Canada’s energy sectorWHAT’S ON DECK THURSDAYCANADA8:30 a.m.Merchandise Trade Balance (May): Economists expect a deficit of $300,000 UNITED STATES8:30 a.m.Employment Report: Economists expect a gain of 215,000 jobs and the jobless rate to hold at 6.3% Weekly jobless claims: Economists expect 313,000 new claims, up from last week Goods and Services Trade Balance (May): Economists expect a deficit of $45-billion Non-manufacturing ISM Index (June): Economists expect a reading of 56.3

admin | 3216976577@qq.com

Related Posts

first_imgThe president of the Sports Writers Association of Liberia, SWAL, Mr. Roland Mulbah and several other members were last Friday assaulted by an officer of the Emergency Response Unit (ERU) of the Liberia National Police, causing them serious injuries.The incident occurred before the Liberia versus La Cote d’Ivoire match when ERU officers refused to allow some members of the SWAL to enter the stadium.Mr. Mulbah, who participated in a joint meeting with the Liberia National Police to craft guidelines for the game, explained to the officers that the SWAL was assured by the LNP that its officers would be informed about the joint decision on sports writers covering the game, but the officers were adamant.“One of the officers threatened to beat us if we did not leave the area,” Mulbah told the Daily Observer afterwards. “When I told him that it was a joint decision with the LNP and pleaded with him to let our members enter the stadium, he began to whip us, pointing his gun on us.”The assault resulted into a cut on Mulbah’s right jaw, and as blood oozed out of his injury, the officer got more incensed and continued his assault, as bystanders looked in shock.As the ERU officer beat the president of SWAL and several others, Victor Bowier, in charge of security at the LFA, and also a police officer, was called in, whose interventions ended the torture that the SWAL president and his members were undergoing.Mulbah and his colleagues received treatment at a nearby clinic before returning to the game. Mulbah’s jaw was bandaged. He expressed regret of the ERU officer’s action and appealed to the LNP to ensure that when decisions are made, “every officer who will be involved is informed about it.”Before the match, LNP Deputy Director for Operations, Prince Mulbah and SWAL president, along with SWAL Secretary General Kolubah Zayzay participated in the joint conference that came out with guidelines to ensure the smooth management of the match against La Cote d’ivoire.SWAL president Mulbah at the time said the association was working closely with the LNP to provide better coverage for the game.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

first_imgA SigAlert was issued at 1:19 a.m. and all eastbound lanes were closed until 3:43 a.m., when the SigAlert was cancelled, said California Highway Patrol Officer David Porter. LA CRESCENTA – A pedestrian was fatally struck on a freeway in La Crescenta today when he ran in front of a car in what authorities described as a suicide. The pedestrian, a man of between 25 and 30, was struck by a Toyota Camry on the eastbound Foothill (210) Freeway at Rosemont Avenue about 1 a.m., said Sgt. Michael Telles of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Crescenta Valley Station. He was pronounced dead at the scene, he said. According to witnesses, the man ran onto the roadway, apparently looking to get struck, Telles said. The man driving the Camry stopped and was questioned at the scene before being allowed to go on his way, Telles said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

first_imgA claim has often been made by geologists that the rock sediments record cyclical changes in Earth’s orbit.  Milankovitch cycles, named for the man who analyzed them, are a set of regular periodic changes to the orbital eccentricity, obliquity, and axial precession of the Earth over tens and hundreds of thousands of years.  These subtle changes, it is alleged, produce climate change and sea level fluctuations.  The climate forcing, in turn, produces periodic differences in the thickness of sedimentary layers.  The search for Milankovitch signatures in rock records has been used as a method of dating sediments.    Geologists at Virginia State and Virginia Polytechnic tested this hypothesis with computer models.  They specifically encoded Milankovitch-like cycles in the production of sediments.  The layering produced was indistinguishable from randomness, according to their report in the Journal of Geology.1  Here was their conclusion:The simulations used a cyclic Milankovitch driver to produce cyclic stratigraphy, but the lithofacies thickness frequencies and autocorrelation methods used to analyze the resultant rock successions found that these records often appeared independent of periodic orbital forcing.  This indicates that the factors involved in depositing cyclic sedimentary layers, as simulated in the model, tend to mask the original periodic signal (such as Milankovitch orbital forcing) and produce the appearance of independence or stochasticity.  The hypothesis is that the rocks are independent of extrabasinal forcing, and these simulations indicate how difficult it is to disprove such independence.  Real rock successions are very likely to have been historically more complex than our simulations governed by merely a few basic parameters.  This poses a challenge to even most cleverly designed quantitative methods used to test for stratigraphic patterns, with their statistical outcomes being inherently ambiguous: does a given outcome indicate that the record was not formed in a cyclic fashion, or does it merely reflect the fact that an original cyclic driver has been masked by the complexity of depositional processes?  It is important, therefore, to have controls by which these methods can be tested.  The use of simulations can provide such controls by producing synthetic data with known Milankovitch cyclic drivers and thus providing an independent assessment of statistical methods applied to test real empirical records.They said the results they got with known cyclic drivers was “extremely noisy.”  Obtaining a significant signature required extreme climate differences, like between greenhouse and icehouse conditions for 100,000 years.  Even then, the results were ambiguous: “even with high-magnitude sea level fluctuations, a periodic driver of sediment deposition can be concealed.”.  And that’s not the only factor: “The incompleteness of the carbonate stratigraphic record may act to conceal cyclic driving forces,” they said, “in turn making it difficult to assess the quality of methods developed to measure cyclicity.”  Their computer simulations, they felt, provided a missing control on the theory:The methods for testing for the presence or absence of a Milankovitch driver in ancient successions must demonstrate patterns that are distinct from what would be expected if the rocks were deposited independent of orbital forcing.  One of the problems with many of the methods for detecting cyclicity is that they test a single series (e.g., a stratigraphic column).  This tends to miss lateral substitution of facies that occurs at similar water depths in real settings.  The benefit of using simulations is their ability to capture information such as periods of no deposition or gaps in deposition from erosion that would otherwise be difficult to quantify in real successions.1.  Dexter, Kowalewski and Read, “Distinguishing Milankovitch-Driven Processes in the Rock Record from Stochasticity Using Computer-Simulated Stratigraphy,” The Journal of Geology,2009, volume 117, p. 349�361, DOI: 10.1086/599021.Another dating method is shown to be a bruised reed.  Unfortunately, some well-meaning books like The Privileged Planet have leaned on this reed: “Finally, there are the Milankovitch cycles, probably the single most useful type of clock for layered deposits” (p. 30).  If this is the best, what about the others?  They tried to defend it with mathematical talk about Fourier analysis and power spectra (p. 370 n25), assuming that sophisticated math can discern a reliable signal in noise.  They did not consider the possibility of getting false signals in actual noise.  Then they used it and other methods to portray an old earth embedded with log records of its history over vast ages.    Although that section did not harm the basic thesis of the book (that our planet appears designed for scientific discovery), it exposes a weakness of some well-meaning attempts to ground design inferences in shaky foundations.  Layers of rocks record something, obviously, but the time scale and explanations become increasingly tenuous when eyewitnesses are unavailable and multiple causes are involved.  We should be wary of taking published scientific claims uncritically and placing too much authority in the ability of secular scientists to discern unobservable history through their worldview-tainted glasses.    Be wary especially of the divination methods of pagans (examples: 11/06/2008, 07/26/2008, 06/12/2008, 01/25/2008).  Would Daniel have referred to the scholarship of the Babylonian hepatoscopists as a reliable source?(Visited 94 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *