Robert Hilson will be leaving the office of Director of Athletics next month to take on a new assignment as the University’s inaugural Director of Business Development and Partnerships.Tom Arkell, Associate Vice-President of University Services, said the new position will focus on advancing sponsorships and new business development, as well as marketing the wide range services and facilities within the University Services division. University Services operates such units as Dining Services, Residences, Parking Services, Conference & Event Services, Printing & Digital Services, Youth University and Athletics & Recreation.“Universities are moving in this direction, looking to generate more revenue from their existing assets,” said Arkell, “and Robert is well positioned to help get us to the next level in that respect.”Hilson joined Brock as Director of Athletics in 2011. During his tenure he developed the department’s first strategic plan, significantly grew revenue and oversaw five national varsity athletics championships (second in Ontario).Chris Critelli will serve as Interim Director of Athletics while a search is conducted for a full-time replacement. Critelli, currently Assistant Director of Athletics, is a former Canadian Olympian basketball player and a familiar figure at Brock, having served as a coach and administrator in Athletics for 32 years.

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first_imgThe Buchanan City Court in Grand Bassa County is holding a nanny goat in custody while two men claim ownership of the animal.The plaintiff, identified as Amadu Jalloh, a resident of Kilby Street in Buchanan City, complained to the court that on December 29, 2014, one Harris Luke unlawfully stole his white-striped brown and black nanny goat.Jalloh told the court that the nanny goat cost him US$60. The case is being presided over by Associate Magistrate Vasco Brown. Defendant Harris Luke has formally been charged with theft of property, which is violation of section 15.51 of the New Penal Law of Liberia.At the hearing last week, the state was represented byAssistant City Solicitor Johnson Tukeh, while Grand Bassa County Public Defender, Cllr. Paul P. Jarvan represented the defendant.Cllr. Jarvan requested the court to dismiss the case on the grounds that since the defendant was taken to court, the private prosecutor had deliberately failed to appear to proceed with the case, which contravenes section 18.2 of the Criminal Procedure Law of Liberia.“The holding of the defendant’s property clearly indicates that the state does not have sufficient evidence to prosecute the case,” he argued.In response, the state said the defense must be in line with the law, and at that juncture, the prosecution interposed no objection.The court, having listened to the submissions of the two lawyers, ordered the return of the nanny goat to defendant Luke in keeping with the Law of Liberia.According to the Police Charge Sheet, Defendant Harris Luke, 26, a resident on New York Street in Buchanan, during investigations, reportedly said he bought the goat from one Francis Glaydor on December 28, 2014.According to him, the goat went missing from his residence on Kilby Street on December 29.Based on this circumstance, the police charged defendant Luke with “theft of property.”The Daily Observer gathered that an unidentified lady found the nanny goat in a sugar cane farm and called Radio Gbehzohn FM 106.3 requesting the owner to retrieve it. After the announcement, the two men came to claim ownership which eventually got to the police.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

first_imgMiatta has a story to tell, one that describes the loss of innocence.“Since I was a child, I’ve been living from home to home. I quite recently moved back in with my biological mother and understand why,” she says.Miatta composes herself just like any normal teenager would; she spends most of her time playing jumprope, kickball and hanging out with friends.But she hides a dark secret.According to Miatta, the hardest part of her life is having to answer the one question so many people ask her over and over again.“Where is your pa?,”Nine years ago, Fallah, Miatta’s father, was arrested and charged for the rape of a seven year old girl; Miatta’s friend.“Our mothers went out of town and left us at my aunty’s house for the weekend. My father lived in his own house back then and never had access to us throughout the weekend. I don’t know how she was raped by my father,” Miatta said.Miatta was five when officers knocked on her mothers door to tell her about her husband’s arrest.“They said my father raped my friend that weekend and he has been in jail since then,” she added.Ironically, the complainant never followed the case and, according to Miatta, her father has been in prison for the past nine years without trial.“I was 10 when my mother told me about my father. And she did so by taking me to the Monrovia Central Prison to see him,”she says. “It was scary, but after he told me his side, I decided not to judge him,” she added.Since then, Miatta has been visiting her father weekly, never once missing a week.“My concern is knowing the truth and that can only be done if my father is given a fair trail. Where are his accusers? Since they accused my father, they just left him in prison,” Miatta added.Meanwhile, Miatta says she wants justice to be served if her father is guilty and set free if he’s Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

first_imgThe joint bid put the two squarely against real estate mogul Sam Zell, whose own bid is reportedly valued at $33 per share. Representatives of Tribune presented Broad and Burkle with a series of questions on their bid late Friday afternoon, according to the person familiar with the talks. The pair responded to the questions and said they stood by their current offer, the person said. The Burkle-Broad joint bid includes $500 million in cash and would use an employee stock ownership plan to raise money for a buyout. A previous bid by the duo was also valued at $34 per share and included $500 million, but did not include the stock ownership plan. It is believed that Zell was proposing to invest $300 million and use a stock ownership plan. It was unclear Friday if Zell would update his offer, or whether the company’s board would extend its Saturday deadline to review Broad and Burkle’s bid. A spokeswoman for Zell declined to comment. The nation’s second-largest newspaper publisher by circulation also is said to be considering a “self-help” plan that would involve spinning off the company’s broadcast division and borrowing money to pay a one-time cash dividend to shareholders. CHICAGO – Investors awaiting word of a Tribune Co. buyout sent the company’s stock up nearly 2 percent in afternoon trading Friday, as a special committee of directors considered dueling proposals to acquire the media conglomerate. The Chicago-based company set an end-of-March deadline to announce results of its six-month-long strategic review. But company spokesman Gary Weitman remained silent on the status of negotiations Friday afternoon. Tepid bidding for Tribune Co. took an eleventh-hour twist Thursday night when Los Angeles billionaires Eli Broad and Ron Burkle submitted a sweetened offer for the company that owns the Chicago Tribune and Los Angeles Times. The pair valued their offer at $34 per share, according to a person familiar with the offer who was not authorized to disclose details and asked to remain anonymous. As the Saturday evening deadline approached, everyone from Wall Street analysts to anxious journalists were left to speculate about the outcome of any deal. “I’m certain they want to get closure sooner rather than later,” said S.W. “Sammy” Papert, head of newspaper consulting firm Belden Associates in Dallas. “From an operational standpoint, this is driving people crazy. It’s tough enough in the newspaper space right now without these distractions going on.” Tribune announced its willingness to sell all or part of the company in September after being pressured by several large shareholders angered by its lagging stock price and sagging fortunes. Leading the outcry was the Chandler family, which owned the Los Angeles Times for decades.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

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