TR4 confirmed in Colombia as country declares nat

first_img TR4 confirmed in Colombia as country declares “nat … February 13 , 2019 Sigatoka risk greatly increased by climate change, … You might also be interested in “2018 was a complex year for Colombian agricultural exports, but the banana sector grew by 2.52% compared to 2017,” said Juan Camilo Restrepo Gómez.”The year was influenced by climatological factors like the El Niño Phenomenon and the high amount of wind in the production areas, which reduced fruit production during some months of the year.”He added in 2019 it will be fundamental to advance on the implementation of a country-wide label or a denomination of origin to help grow in markets and open new destinations.In late December Augura warned producers to prepare for a dry spell expected to last over the first few months of this year. center_img The Colombian banana industry closed 2018 with a production of a little over 100 million boxes, marking nearly 3% year-on-year growth despite some weather-related challenges.Industry association Augura, whose members represent 78% of the total volume, said the country’s crop was equivalent in value to US$859 million.Bananas remain Colombia’s third-largest agricultural export after coffee and flowers. U.S. judge denies Chiquita’s request to be let out … Australia: Queensland govt boosts TR4 funding, cal …last_img read more

UK Tesco trials removing plastic from fruit and

first_img U.K.: Tesco trials removing plastic from fruit and … A pair of premium Japanese mangoes from Miyazaki Prefecture fetched a record ¥500,000 (US$4,500) in the season’s first auction at a local wholesale market earlier this month, topping the previous best of ¥400,000 (US$3,500), Japan Times reports.The premium mangoes are called Taiyo no Tamago , meaning Egg of the Sun. To qualify for this description, they must reportedly meet strict criteria: weigh at least 350 grams each, possess a high sugar content and have more than 50 percent of their skin covered in a bright red hue.The mangoes were bought by a local produce wholesale company.“The record price will give a lift to those who grew the mangoes,” said Shota Tatemoto, a 35-year-old employee of the wholesaler. April 18 , 2019 Leading fruit breeders form alliance to fight risi … You might also be interested in Brazilian table grape exports soar in H1 as other … last_img read more

Chile opens for Australian almonds

first_img Chile opens for Australian almonds … July 30 , 2019 Australia expecting best quality almond crop in a … Australia’s Hort Innovation is funding a new project aimed at building the country’s capability to detect and control Xylella fastidiosa, should it ever enter the country.The harmful bacterium has been dubbed the number one plant biosecurity threat to Australia. It is transmitted by common sap-sucking insects such as spittlebugs and sharpshooters.The impact of Xylella overseas has been catastrophic, infecting more than 200 million citrus trees in Brazil. It has also destroyed one million olive trees in Italy and devastated the Californian grape sector, Hort Innovation said.The pathogen – not yet present in Australia or New Zealand – can cause significant damage to many important crops. These include grapevines, olives, nuts, citrus, stone fruit, blueberries and cherries.In fact, over 500 cultivated and uncultivated herbaceous and woody plant species are known hosts of Xylella.A new collaborative research project managed by Hort Innovation will be led by Dr. Rachel Mann from the Victorian Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (JPR). It’s additionally supported by Western Australian, NSW and Queensland primary industries and New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries.This collaborative effort ensures labs that currently provide diagnostic capability in Australia and New Zealand are prepared.New project to look at new detection and surveillance methodsHort Innovation research and development manager Dr. Penny Measham said the project was looking at new methods for detection and surveillance. This is being done through the development of innovative diagnostic tools.“Currently, detection is difficult as the pathogen has a long latent period and not all plant hosts exhibit symptoms,” she said. Australia scores improved citrus, carrot access to … center_img “Furthermore, the different strains of X. fastidiosa, classified into subspecies, can behave like different diseases in different hosts.”Measham said the value of subspecies identification was paramount during incursion mode.“Along with international collaboration, the project aims to establish an Australian based X. fastidiosa genome database to assist with design and validation of X. fastidiosa subspecies specific diagnostic tools that are both rapid and accurate,” she said.“The fast turn-around of this information could be the difference between eradication and moving to management of this devastating pest.”Project lead, Dr Rachel Mann, said the current National Diagnostic Protocol (NDP) for Australia is for the detection and identification of Xylella. It is focussed specifically on Pierces disease.“This project will review and adopt the world’s best practice diagnostic methods for the detection and identification of Xylella and it’s subspecies, and ensure diagnosticians are trained and proficient in using the revised National Diagnostic Protocol,” she said.“In the event of a suspect sample being identified, our state diagnostic laboratories will be the first to deal with these samples.”It is therefore essential that the capacity to handle these samples be developed and tested now – not during a potential incursion.Mann said the adoption of the Xylella NDP would be immediate. She said the NDP will be used to screen plant material entering Australia and will also support active surveillance programs.It will also be used during an incursion or during the detection of the exotic vector, the glassy-winged sharpshooter. AUS: Proposed Great Barrier Reef regulations ‘igno … You might also be interested inlast_img read more